Standing in a pool full of 2-foot-long alligators, Jay Young starts teaching a class on gator wrestling.

"He who hesitates gets bit. Don't think about it," says Young, owner of Colorado Gators. "Alligator wrestling is not a thinking man's sport."

It takes a certain kind of crazy to want to pay $100 to handle animals sensible people run away from. People do sign up, however, ready to try their hands at this most extreme of sports.

Libya's longtime leader Moammar Gadhafi bankrolled and championed the vision of a United States of Africa, with himself as the continental president. As Libya struggles to find its equilibrium on the cusp of what appears to be the post-Gadhafi era, one question is its future as part of Africa: The African Union has not officially recognized the rebel leadership in Libya, saying "regime change" and outside intervention were wrong and that NATO overstepped its U.N.-authorized no-fly-zone mandate.

Forecasters say Lee has weakened to a tropical depression with top sustained winds of 35 mph.

The National Hurricane center in Miami says the weather system is continuing its slow crawl to the east-northeast at 7 mph. It was centered about 55 miles west-northwest of McComb, Mississippi.

The downgrade in its status means that all tropical storm watches and warnings have been discontinued.

Forecasters expect the tropical depression to move across Mississippi overnight and on Monday.

Consultants have been practically tripping over each other to launch superPACs backing Texas Gov. Rick Perry. However, some prospective donors may find presidential superPACs are a gray area.

By now there's a superPAC independently supporting every major presidential candidate. Three of these groups have surfaced to promote Perry. In California, Bob Schuman says he was ready to go before Perry was.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LAURA SULLIVAN, host: We're back with ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Laura Sullivan.

(SOUNDBITE OF NEWS BROADCAST)

CHRIS WALLACE: The big story this Labor Day weekend is how many Americans are still not working.

The Government's Case Against The Banks

Sep 3, 2011

During the housing boom, banks sold investors bundles of mortgages that were shoddier than promised, according to lawsuits the federal government filed yesterday.

This allegation won't come as a surprise to anyone who has followed the financial crisis; similar accusations have been flying around for years.

It's the scope of the lawsuits that makes them such a big deal: 17 separate suits naming many of the world's biggest banks and covering nearly $200 billion in mortgage-backed securities.

Not having a summer or after-school job affects more than just a kid's wallet. It also has real consequences for his or her personal and economic development.

While the overall unemployment rate is stuck at 9.1 percent, the unemployment rate for 16- to 19-year-olds has been going up since February. Currently 25.4 percent of teenagers who want jobs can't find them.

President Obama is set to deliver a major speech on jobs next Thursday, and his task will be even more challenging after Friday's monthly government jobs report. The U.S. Labor Department says there was no job growth for the first time in a year, and unemployment was unimproved, staying at 9.1 percent.

NPR's Scott Horsley tells Weekend Edition host Scott Simon some jobs were added, but not enough to make up for other losses.

The founder of WikiLeaks, Julian Assange, once said his mission was not simply to divulge secrets, but to make sure the release of that information actually made a difference.

He shared his trove of diplomatic cables with The New York Times, the Guardian in London, and other news organizations so they could draw the world's attention to the most important parts.

In 1969, astronaut Alan Bean went to the moon as the lunar module pilot on Apollo 12. Although the trip going to the moon covered the same distance as the trip back, "returning from the moon seemed much shorter," Bean says.

People will often feel a return trip took less time than the same outbound journey, even though it didn't. In the case of Apollo 12, the trip back from the moon really did take somewhat less time. But the point remains that this so-called "return trip effect" is a very real psychological phenomenon, and now a new scientific study provides an explanation.

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Arts & Culture

John Clare

WBAA Arts Spotlight: Native American Education And Cultural Center

John Clare talks to Felica Ahasteen-Bryant, Director of the Native American Educational and Cultural Center at Purdue about Native American Heritage Month . November marks a month-long celebration to recognize, honor and celebrate Indigenous Peoples. The NAECC "serves as the focal point for campus and community events and sponsors an array of cultural presentations featuring traditional and contemporary Native American scholars, art demonstrations, educational tours, workshops and...

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Ask The Mayor: Frankfort's Chris McBarnes On Parks, Apartments And Hot Dogs

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we talk with Frankfort Mayor Chris McBarnes about downtown revitalization. Frankfort is struggling to fill agribusiness and manufacturing jobs, so the city is trying to improve life outside of work, and focusing on parks and apartments to build a larger employee pool.

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The last two surviving leaders of Cambodia's brutal Khmer Rouge regime of the 1970s were found guilty Friday by an international tribunal on charges of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes.

The conviction of Nuon Chea, 92, the chief lieutenant of the regime's infamous leader, Pol Pot, and Khieu Samphan, 87, the former head of state, is the first official acknowledgement that at least some of the estimated 2 million people who died at the hands of the Khmer Rouge from 1975 to 1979 were victims of an orchestrated genocide.

From the ominous narratives of Vince Staples to Kanye West's blunt partisanship, the line between the personal and political in hip-hop is becoming increasingly thin.

It's been little more than a year since Tyler, the Creator emerged fully formed from post-adolescence to deliver a surprisingly mature quarter-life crisis LP. But if 2017's Flower Boy left fans wondering whether the young visionary Odd Future was losing touch with his inner child, fear not. Just in time for the holidays, he's returned like Secret Santa with a bag of unexpected goodies.

A New Jersey couple and a homeless veteran caught in an acrimonious battle over more than $400,000 in donations to a GoFundMe fundraiser have been charged with second degree felonies for allegedly fabricating the story that got them the money in the first place.

"The entire campaign was predicated on a lie," Burlington County Prosecutor Scott Coffina said at a news conference on Thursday.

The couple, Katelyn McClure and Mark D'Amico, and Johnny Bobbitt Jr. have been charged with second degree theft by deception and conspiracy to commit theft by deception, Coffina said.

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