A New York judge dismissed the sexual assault case against the former head of the International Monetary Fund. The charges, reports the AP, were officially dismissed after a New York appeals court denied the accuser's request for a special prosecutor.

Yesterday, prosecutors asked the judge to drop the charges against Dominique Strauss-Kahn, because of issues with the credibility of his accuser.

The AP adds:

Beauty Shop: DSK, Kardashian, 'Colombiana'

Aug 23, 2011

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, host: I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News.

Now we step into the Beauty Shop. That's where we get a woman's perspective on the things happening in the news.

Fighting Rages On Inside Tripoli

Aug 23, 2011

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Britain's phone hacking scandal took another sharp turn today, after the BBC reported that a former editor at News of the World received payment from News International, even after he took a job as the Prime Minister's top press aide.

The BBC reports:

These payments were part of his severance package, under what is known as a "compromise agreement".

When Clyde Jackson's wife took a $6 hourly pay cut several years ago, it was the beginning of his rapid descent from two-time homeowner to renter in an apartment complex in the working-class Washington, D.C., suburb of Greenbelt, Md.

Jackson, 51, is an African-American father of three who works for a local government sanitation agency. In December, he lost a three-bedroom brick home to foreclosure. He purchased the house for $245,000 in 2004.

The thousands of visitors at the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington this week will reflect on the controversial likeness of the man, his legacy and the significance of the first nonpresident — and first African-American — immortalized on the National Mall.

But most of them probably won't know who built it.

Two years into the economic recovery, the housing market is still showing signs of struggle. New numbers released by the Commerce Department today showed that purchases of new homes fell 0.7 percent in July and hit the lowest level in five months.

Bloomberg reports:

We have to confess we didn't know that for decades, scientists have been trying to find the "parent yeast" that makes lager beer possible.

Apparently they were.

And now, they may have an answer: Beech forests in Argentina.

"The largest earthquake to strike Colorado in almost 40 years" shook buildings but apparently caused little damage late last night, Denver's ABC 7 News reports. A few homes may have been damaged and some rock slides were reported.

It was a 5.3 magnitude temblor and the epicenter was "about 180 miles south of Denver."

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Two Gentlemen Of Verona 2/15 Preview

A William Shakespeare early comedy, The Two Gentlemen of Verona raises questions about the loyalty between two friends who are smitten with the same young woman. WBAA Music Director John Clare spoke with Purdue graduate student Malena Gordo who is in the production opening Friday.

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City of Frankfort

Ask The Mayor: Frankfort's Chris McBarnes On Parks, Apartments And Hot Dogs

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