Emilie Syberg

Reporter / Morning Edition Host

On November 27, 2017, we welcomed Emilie Syberg to the WBAA family. Emilie has recently returned to the states, after participating in the Peace Corps from June 2014 to August of 2016, where she worked as an English teacher in Zambia. After attending grad school for Journalism at Northwestern University, Emilie joined WBAA as a Morning Show Host and Reporter. Emilie is passionate about the morning show series because she believes it is a great way to start your day. As a reporter, Emilie enjoys that the process of reporting one feature can blossom into a series of stories. In the future she is looking forward to reporting on the issues that are affecting low income families and individuals. In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her family, visiting museums, and is an avid news junkie. WBAA is excited to have Emilie Syberg as a part of our team and we look forward to seeing what she has in store for the future.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

Clinton County Humane Society board members submitted documentation Monday night to show just how they’ve spent City of Frankfort funds on a trap, neuter, release program.

Mayor Chris McBarnes says while he was happy a subdued city council meeting was “civil and well-run,” he believes gaps remain in the information provided.

WBAA file photo

An e-mail obtained by WBAA News appears to show a Frankfort city councilman and the now-head of the county’s embattled Humane Society teaming up against Mayor Chris McBarnes as the shelter tries to explain how it spends its money – an e-mail McBarnes says he was dismayed to read.

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

Board member resignations. Viral rumors on social media. Tax-paying citizens turning out en masse to demand answers. At the center of it all? The Clinton County Humane Society. What started out as a personnel dispute may turn out to be a harbinger of much larger financial problems in the county.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, Crawfordsville is on a quest for funding to mitigate train challenges through the Local Trax program — we ask where they stand in the application process, and how their application stands out. 

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

A bill passed during the 2018 legislative session requires public high schools in Indiana to offer a computer science elective, starting in 2021. But smaller school districts could find compliance more challenging.

courtesy City of Frankfort

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, the school safety conversation continues. Frankfort has placed school resource officers in local schools—but will they be opting into the state’s handheld metal detector program? Is there more than one way to ensure student safety? And how can Frankfort stay prepared outside of school?

We’ll also discuss Frito-Lay’s plans to expand in Frankfort, with two new production lines in the works and additional warehouse space—but is there room for even more job creation?

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, a study shows more housing units will be needed in the downtown Lafayette area in the next few years to meet demand—and that both older and younger professionals looking to move there are part of that equation. How does the city create a downtown that appeals to everyone?

In this week's talk with Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski, we’ll discuss concerns surrounding road construction and traffic at the Sagamore Parkway and State Road 26 intersection--and how about those decorative lights?

City of West Lafayette

 

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we’re going back to school. School shootings have dominated the headlines over the past year, and the state of Indiana is supplying free handheld metal detectors to schools who request them--but will the West Lafayette School Corporation sign on? What’s the best way to ensure safety, with an awareness of gun violence heightened after the Noblesville shooting in May?

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

Following reporting by WBAA News on delays in accepting food stamps at the Lafayette and West Lafayette farmer’s markets, those programs have begun to ramp up.

The Lafayette Farmer’s Market has begun accepting Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, benefits. A month into the process, twelve vendors have agreed to opt in to accept the vouchers. But the work to get the program up and running has only just begun.

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

Every year, the federal Summer Food Service Program feeds children in low-income areas whose access to consistent meals can become limited once the school year ends. Food Finders Food Bank in Lafayette has been sponsoring program sites for nine years.

This year, though, they’re trying a different approach - feeding kids at private homes. The pieces are still coming together. 

Pages