Mark Memmott

As we report about the "Unite the Right" rally planned for this weekend near the White House, keep in mind that the labels many groups create for themselves and those that the media put on them rarely fit well and should be avoided or put in context.

The number of misspelled names that have made their way into digital stories has edged down in the past couple weeks and we're catching more of them in scripts and other places before publication. Thank you.

But the evidence indicates we have a bad habit. It looks like we're not always double-checking the spelling of some familiar folks' names. We must be trusting our memories.

Some examples from recent months follow. We have:

I've bored many with the story that one of the first things an editor told me was that I should delete words that end with "ly" from my stories.

But it actually works. Stories really do read and sound better. By eliminating those "throwaway intensifiers" you literally open up space for action words that definitely move a story along.

The woman charged with being an unregistered Russian agent has been referred to in headlines and story summaries by us and others as a "student" or "graduate student."

While it has been reported that she entered the U.S. on a student visa, simply referring to her that way in headlines and introductions could mislead those who don't read or listen to the rest of a story. It makes it sound like her reason for coming to the U.S. was to get an education. That's a conclusion we shouldn't jump to.

As we continue to report about the president and his view of what the U.S. intelligence community has concluded regarding Russian interference in the 2016 election, we need to be careful about references to the 2017 analysis issued by the Director of National Intelligence.

While the DNI does speak on behalf of 17 intelligence agencies, the work that led to the assessment about Russian interference came from three of the 17 — the CIA, FBI and NSA.

Five weeks of data show our corrections pace has not slowed. We're still on a 100-a-month pace.

The basic message today is a repeat: "We must start CQ'ing." Reread that "Memmo" for more about how to do that.

Now that everyone is clued in about CQ'ing, we want to talk about a simple step toward accuracy that some have been taking for years, but others aren't.

Copy and paste.

We're not suggesting anyone lift lines or phrases from others' reporting. That's plagiarism.

What we're talking about is an efficient way to get some things right the first time.

There have been a few occasions recently where some listeners thought it sounded like we were using the phrase "catch and release" as if it's a neutral description of what happens to some people who have entered the country illegally.

But any phrase that compares something done to human beings to something done to animals is not neutral. It is phrasing meant to frame the debate.

Debunking falsehoods has long been among our standard practices. As we've said:

When There's No Evidence To Support A Claim, We Should Say That

You've hopefully heard about the meetings we've been having regarding the mistakes we've been making. If you haven't been to one of the discussions yet, watch for an invitation.

As has been said many times at the sessions so far, it's important upfront to acknowledge that we're doing more good work — but without more good people. Almost everyone is stretched. Thanks are in order for all that you do.

But, then there's this: We've posted about 100 corrections a month this year.

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