agribusiness

China’s newest list of proposed tariffs include one of Indiana's staple crops – soybeans – and would hit the Hoosier agriculture industry hard.

Purdue professor of agricultural economics Wally Tyner and colleague Farzard Taheripour studied the possible impact the tariff like the one announced would have on the U.S. Tyner says the 25 percent proposed tariff on soybeans would hurt the U.S. economy.

The $130-billion merger of chemical and material manufacturing giants Dow and DuPont is now official, nearly two years after it was first announced.

In the next 18 months, the newly created DowDuPont will split into three businesses – for material sciences, specialty products and agricultural chemicals.

The agriculture division stands to affect Indiana the most. Dow AgroSciences has 1,500 workers in Indianapolis, and more at seed and chemical dealerships statewide.

New regulations for how big farms handle raw produce won’t affect the hundreds of vendors that sell at Indiana farmers markets.

But small-scale growers still have plenty of rules to follow.

In a trailer at the Lafayette Farmers Market, Graham Rider digs through a freezer stuffed with plastic packages of frozen meat. His family owns Thistle Byre Farm in Burnettsville.

“Here’s our thermometer,” Rider says, pulling it out from beneath totes of ground beef and lamb. “Oh, good. It’s below 20.”

Indiana’s growing number of wineries and small vineyards want to make the Hoosier state synonymous with wine country.

Yet, a tricky climate limits what grapes they can grow in-state, and complex regulations limit where they can sell the resulting wines.

So these local wine destinations are finding other ways to make their marks.

At Two-Ee’s Winery near Huntington, the barrels and tanks in the production room are full of juice from grapes you’ve probably never heard of.

A new report from the Animal Welfare Institute says Indiana lags in enforcing humane slaughter rules at small, state-inspected meat plants – that it issues citations, but never stops production.

The Indiana Board of Animal Health took issue with that logic, saying its inspectors are doing their jobs.

 

Generations of farmers, agronomists, lawmakers and other alumni of Purdue’s College of Agriculture met for their annual Fish Fry, amid a lot of political and economic uncertainty for the farm industry.

That fact wasn’t lost on the hundreds of Purdue agriculture alumni who flocked to the Indiana State Fairgrounds Saturday.

Most of them rely on farm exports to Mexico, China and other countries where President Donald Trump has pledged to reform trade deals. And Indiana Agriculture Secretary Ted McKinney says it’s on people’s minds.

Indiana’s $11 billion farming sector is hoping to benefit under President Donald Trump.

The new commander-in-chief has threatened some trade deals that agriculture relies on. But many in the industry hope his nominee to lead the Department of Agriculture will have a different take.

Sonny Perdue is a former Georgia governor and commercial farming veteran. His home state is known for cotton, peanuts and livestock, not corn and soybeans.

But Jane Ade Stevens, Indiana Corn Marketing Council and Soybean Alliance CEO, says Perdue still has a background in cash crops.

Annie Ropeik / Indiana Public Broadcasting

  

Indiana has a shortage of farm veterinarians -- and that strain could get worse in January when new rules for food animal antibiotics use take effect.

The change will mean more demand for veterinarians in rural Indiana.

One of those vets is Tom Troxel. He takes care of dairy cows, and he and his wife Luann also run a small dairy farm in LaPorte County.

By just before 8 a.m., the first part of their day is already over: the cows have been milked, and Luann is feeding the last of the calves.

As Big Ag Mergers Pile Up, Farmers Brace For Impacts

Sep 14, 2016
Annie Ropeik / Indiana Public Broadcasting

The list of big agribusinesses pursuing mergers is growing, and their plans could affect Indiana facilities.

Germany's Bayer is buying St. Louis-based Monsanto, and two Canadian fertilizer-makers, Potash and Agrium, announced Monday that they'll seek to join forces, too.

Potash just opened a $90 million fertilizer distribution warehouse and rail hub in Lake County, but its future is now unclear.

Fairlife / Ballotpedia / Egg Industry Center

Three prominent Hoosier farmers will be part of the agricultural advisory committee for the Trump-Pence campaign.

The Indiana-based co-chairs of Trump's agriculture committee represent three of the largest and most well-connected farm businesses in the state and the country.

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