Alzheimer's Disease

Indiana University research identified a tiny molecule that may signal the presence of some types of dementia. Researchers say this could be a first step to developing an early test for Alzheimer’s.

Unlike regular "messenger RNA," which direct cells to produce specific proteins, microRNA plays a regulatory role, increasing or decreasing the number of proteins that messenger RNAs encode. 

Study Examines ACA Impact On Cognitive Impairment

Apr 13, 2018

An Indiana researcher co-authored the first study to look at whether or not an annual wellness visit improves the detection of cognitive impairment. 

Partnership Offers Rides To Alzheimer's Trials

Apr 10, 2018

Alzheimer's scientists say they can't find a cure if they can't do the research, and they can't do the research if they don't have volunteers.

One of the biggest challenges for clinical trial participants is transportation. A new partnership aims to provide rides for volunteers in a new Eli Lilly study in Indianapolis and other locations across the country.  

Indiana Alzheimer's Cases And Costs Rise

Mar 21, 2018
Lyle Bass received an early Alzheimer's diagnosis and has taken steps to improve his overall health and future care. (Alzheimer's Association of Greater Indiana)
Jill Sheridan

A new report finds Alzheimer’s deaths in Indiana are on the rise as well as related costs. 

A special part of the annual 2018 Alzheimer’s Facts and Figures report analyzes the personal and financial savings that an early diagnosis can bring. 

Jill Sheridan / IPB News

A multi-state study to examine early on-set Alzheimer’s will launch soon, and it’s based at Indiana University’s School of Medicine. The Longitudinal Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease or LEADS, is the first, large scale clinical trial to research the disease.

Dr. Liana Apostolova was joined by co-researchers in Indianapolis this week as the study gets underway. The National Institutes of Health awarded the group $7.6 million to research early onset Alzheimer’s.

Awareness Is Aim Of Early Alzheimer's Advisor

Aug 22, 2017

An Indiana woman will play a role in steering the national Alzheimer’s Association when it comes to the disease’s early stages.

Mary Kay Tarbell was recently named as an Early-Stage Advisor for the Alzheimer’s Association. The position provides an opportunity to advance awareness about the importance of early diagnosis.

Tarbell knew the signs of Alzheimer’s.

“I kind of felt the creeping questions,” she says she started asking. “Why am I forgetting this?”

The Indiana University School of Medicine is getting $25 million from the Lilly Endowment to recruit new scientists to Indiana, and to pair them up directly with big Indiana companies.

Medical school research dean Anantha Shekhar says it aims to fast-track the creation of treatments from discoveries about cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s and more.

He says new technologies like gene sequencing are facilitating those applications faster than ever.

Neil Conway / Flickr / https://www.flickr.com/photos/neilconway/3792906411

Numbers recently made available on an Indiana State Department of Health website show a significant increase in the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease among Hoosiers.

In 2011, just more than 2,000 Alzheimer’s deaths were recorded in Indiana. But in 2015 – the most recent year with state data – that figure had climbed by more than a quarter, to more than 2,500.

Sarah Fentem / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Carolyn Kelso and her husband Robert live in a big house north of Indianapolis, with original paintings on the wall and furry throws on the furniture. Carolyn herself is 71, with short blonde hair and stylish chunky black glasses. 

She and her husband take their health seriously, and her mother suffered from Alzheimer’s, so she noticed right away when something was wrong.

“I’d get to the car and go down to the corner, and couldn’t remember where I was going, couldn’t remember if I was going left or right,” Carolyn Kelso says.

milosz1 / https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikolski/

Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly is doubling down on its anti-Alzheimer’s disease efforts. Even though a high-profile Alzheimer’s drug failed its most recent trial, the pharma giant is still holding out hope the science behind the therapy can work.

Solanezumab would have been a Prozac-style blockbuster for Lilly. Instead, a late-stage clinical trial found it didn’t work the way scientists hoped.

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