Ask The Mayor

City of Frankfort

Frankfort’s Mayor is on the mend this week after an accident in his home a few days ago. On this episode of WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we get Chris McBarnes’ take on what happened.

Also: Does the mayor agree with his police chief’s assessment that the city’s police station is stuck in the 1970s? The county has levied a new tax to try to fix that – a tax the fiscal conservative mayor says he’s in favor of.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Despite months of objections from Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski, Tippecanoe County gets its needle exchange this week – at a fixed location in a neighborhood that Roswarski said he wanted specifically to avoid.

This week on WBAA's Ask The Mayor, we pose this question to the mayor: did all that opposition force the county’s hand into deciding to use the health department’s site as the home of the controversial program?

City of West Lafayette

It doesn’t take much driving around Greater Lafayette to learn the summer’s buzzword: construction.

West Lafayette has less than two weeks before college students begin returning in droves and there are still questions about whether State Street will be open to accommodate that, particularly after last month’s rains and two gas main strikes earlier this week.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Crawfordsville Mayor Todd Barton is focusing a lot these days on fostering cooperation.

He’s hosted the first of what he hopes will be a series of meetings with business leaders, he’s brought together multiple parties to complete a long-stalled road project and he’s working with the state on Stellar Communities projects.

City of Frankfort

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we’re talking about expansion. The Indiana Department of Transportation has released its Next Level Roads Plan, hoping to draw in international industry and Clinton County has welcomed two businesses into a key intersection. But, where will a city like Frankfort go – or grow – now, with others crowding the road?

City of West Lafayette

If it seems to you that Tippecanoe County leaders have been talking forever about starting a needle exchange program, that’s just an illusion – it’s only been about eight months since the first approvals began.

But if it has seemed to you that in recent months support for such a program from some local leaders has waned, that may be true.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Crawfordsville Mayor Todd Barton has made visits this month to businesses granted tax abatements by the city.

It’s normal – required, in many cases – for some sort of check-in to happen, but on this week’s Ask The Mayor, we find out whether Mayor Barton thinks changes that could be afoot in the coming years thanks to Stellar Cities money may change the way the city looks at abatements.

Also on this week’s show, we check back in on the progress of the reconstituted Crawfordsville Human Rights Commission.

City of Frankfort

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we offer some helpful hints to budding entrepreneurs, including this one: If you want a city to give you a tax abatement, there are a few key words you can use to describe that investment you want to make.

City of West Lafayette

The summer construction season is now in full force and you, the listeners to WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, have many questions about it.

This week, we put those to West Lafayette’s John Dennis and ask him whether he’s surprised that a project as talked about as State Street is still creating as much consternation as it is.

Also on this week’s program, will West Lafayette join the list of hundreds of other cities standing opposed to President Trump’s decision to pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate change agreement?

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

The City of Lafayette has begun evicting some residents from low-income housing just south of the city’s downtown.

That’s because those homes are slated to be razed and replaced with new townhomes.

It’s all part of Mayor Tony Roswarski’s strategy to increase population density near downtown – an area that still doesn’t have a grocery store.

But could such a move be made to help the city’s dilapidated north end, which is home to run-down houses and Lafayette’s highest crime rate?

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