cancer

IDEM Tests Homes, Wells, Sewers In Franklin

19 hours ago

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management is doing more testing for chemicals that could be causing rare child cancers in Franklin. That includes re-testing air in homes that showed high levels of PCE and TCE in the report by the Edison Wetlands Association. 

Report: Indiana Could Take Better Cancer Action

Aug 10, 2018

The American Cancer Society’s study finds Indiana could do more to reduce preventable cancer deaths.  This is the 16th year for the annual “How Do You Measure Up?” analysis.

IU Precision Health Challenge Makes Progress

Jul 31, 2018
Dr. Jay Hess is the Indiana University School of Medicine dean. (Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
Jill Sheridan

Indiana University’s 2016 Grand Challenge aims to advance precision medicine. The precision health challenge seeks to advance treatment and cures for diseases common in Indiana such as cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer’s.

The Environmental Protection Agency was ready to ban some uses of the cancer-causing chemical TCE or trichloroethylene, but EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt put that effort on hold last year. 

Firefighter Aims To Catch Cancer Early

Apr 26, 2018
FACEs and LAM are exhibitors at the annual firefighters conference in Indianapolis. (Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
Jill Sheridan

A new non-profit and an Indiana laboratory have teamed up to promote early cancer detection for firefighters.  The group of emergency responders faces a greater risk of cancer.

Chris Conner founded Firefighters Against Cancer and Exposures, FACEs, to support firefighters going through cancer treatment.  Firefighters encounter more cancer-causing chemicals than they used to. 

Grant To Help Create Holistic Cancer Care

Feb 7, 2018

A new Indiana University School of Medicine program to holistically address a cancer patient’s needs has received a $14 million gift.

Supportive oncology provides extra layers of care for patients with cancer. Some studies show it can help prolong life. The grant from the Walther Cancer Foundation will enable the creation of a program to addresses not just the management of pain and symptoms but also psychological issues like anxiety or depression.

IU School of Medicine Dean Dr. Jay Hess says it’s a growing trend in cancer care.

Targeted Cancer Dyes Get One Step Closer To Market

Nov 2, 2017

A large gift to an Indiana biotech company will help targeted fluorescent dyes advance, the technology helps make cancer surgeries more successful. The imaging compound armed with fluorescent dyes, given to patients before surgery, illuminates cancer cells and help surgeons find and remove lesions that might have been missed.

On Target Laboratories CEO Martin Low says many skilled surgeons have used the product.

“As experienced as they are they still have found additional lesions that they said were clinically relevant and would benefit the patient by removal,” says Low.

Purdue Develops New Tool For Cancer Risk Prevention

Sep 18, 2017

A new device developed at Purdue aims to more easily identify breast cancer risk factors. The so-called “risk-on-a-chip” that could help researchers figure out how cancer starts.

The chip is a plastic nano-tool that allows researchers to create a tiny controlled environment where they can study factors that play into the development of breast cancer.

Purdue cancer pharmacology professor Sophie Lelievre says her theory is that an increase in cancer cases is related to the environment.

The latest assessment from the American Cancer Society details where Indiana lags and what progress it’s made in cancer fighting policies. The American Cancer Society’s Cancer Action Network annual progress report evaluates state legislative efforts.

American Cancer Society’s Bryan Hannon says failure to pass a cigarette tax increase last session set Indiana back in reducing smoking rates. But he says a modest funding increase for tobacco control programs was a step in the right direction.

The Indiana University School of Medicine is getting $25 million from the Lilly Endowment to recruit new scientists to Indiana, and to pair them up directly with big Indiana companies.

Medical school research dean Anantha Shekhar says it aims to fast-track the creation of treatments from discoveries about cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s and more.

He says new technologies like gene sequencing are facilitating those applications faster than ever.

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