Education

Education news

Indiana could soon join a growing list of states with laws allowing students to carry sunscreen at school.

The Food and Drug Administration classifies sunscreen as an over the counter medication, like painkillers or cold medicine, and that means some school policies require students to have a doctor or parent’s note in order to even bring sunscreen to school.

But Sen. Liz Brown (R-Fort Wayne) says the bill she’s filed for the 2018 session aims to change that for the state.

IU Tuition Benefits At Risk From Federal Tax Proposal

Dec 8, 2017

Major changes to U.S. tax policy being debated in Washington have Indiana University officials concerned, because pieces of the proposed plans would negatively impact thousands of IU workers and their families.

Flanner House, an Indianapolis nonprofit, sued Flanner House Elementary School Incorporated for negligence and fraud after it’s school closed in 2014 due to cheating allegations, and those fraud claims were struck down last year. But the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled in favor of the charter school organizer this week, and said the school’s organizing corporation is immune from the nonprofit’s claims through a state law that protects governing bodies.

Department of Education Outlines 2018 Priorities

Nov 28, 2017

State superintendent Jennifer McCormick released her priorities for 2018, and those strategies target three areas: student learning, operational effectiveness and school improvement. In this last category, she says she wants to make it easier for teachers licensed in one content area to teach an additional subject if they have the experience.

Lawmakers Focus On STEM Education For 2018

Nov 27, 2017

Science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, has received a lot of attention at the statehouse lately, and that means the 2018 legislative session could bring major shifts for STEM education throughout the state.

House Education Committee chair Rep. Bob Behning (R-Indianapolis) says he plans to push for more math and science professionals teaching at the elementary school level.

IDOE Asks Public To Comment On Federal Waiver Request

Nov 25, 2017

Graduation rates at some Indiana high schools could plummet due to a new federal definition of regular diplomas. It would prohibit schools from including students who earn the general diploma in calculated graduation rates. Instead, federal guidelines would only count students who earn the Core 40 diploma or above.

General diplomas require fewer math, social studies and science credits – and less testing.

Low and middle income families can struggle to cover college tuition even after state and federal aid.

A new Purdue University grant aims to cover that gap for in-state students earning a first bachelor’s degree.

The Boiler Affordability Grant will cover tuition, fees and book expenses for undergraduates at the West Lafayette campus. Room and board would not be covered.

The Indiana Chamber of Commerce emphasized education in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, in its plans for the 2018 legislative session. Chamber Vice President of Education, Workforce Development & Federal Relations, Caryl Auslander, says a major focus is on making computer science a prerequisite for high school graduation.

“While there are STEM requirements for high school graduation, there is not a computer science requirement,” Auslander says. “And we believe that needs to change.”

One part of Indiana’s education plan under the federal Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA, aims to reduce gaps in teacher effectiveness for low-income and minority students.

But a national research group has criticized the state’s final targets. The National Council of Teacher Quality says the state leaves minority students 4.3 percent more likely to be taught by ineffective teachers. Instead, it says, the state should update the plan to reflect the ultimate objective: elimination of those gaps.

A state committee recommended sweeping changes to high school graduation requirements Tuesday even as many of the details remain unknown.

If approved by the State Board of Education students, starting with the class of 2023, would choose from multiple academic tracts to satisfy three graduation requirements that are designed to better prepare them for college or career.

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