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Government News

Attorney General Curtis Hill says he won’t resign after the governor and other GOP leaders called on him to step down. Instead, Hill wants a new investigation into allegations he groped four women earlier this year.

He calls the allegations “vicious and false,” and says legislative leaders’ inquiry into his conduct is a “travesty.”

Indiana’s Inspector General will investigate sexual misconduct allegations against Attorney General Curtis Hill.

Lori Torres announced Friday her office will look into the accusations after the governor and legislative leaders requested the inquiry. 

Gov. Eric Holcomb hasn't said anything about allegations Curtis Hill groped four women since Holcomb returned home to Indiana from a vacation. (Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Gov. Eric Holcomb won’t say whether Attorney General Curtis Hill should resign after accusations he groped four women.

Holcomb hasn’t said anything about the situation since returning to Indiana from vacation.

Attorney General Curtis Hill has been accused of groping four women – three legislative staffers and one lawmaker. (Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Lauren Chapman

Attorney General Curtis Hill has been accused of groping four women – three legislative staffers and a lawmaker – at a post-session party in March.

Hill denies allegations, and in a statement, he questions the fairness of an investigation initiated by legislative leaders into the accusations.

Independent evaluator Paul Vincent (center left) and DCS Director Terry Stigdon (center right) discuss DCS issues with Indiana's Legislative Council. (Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Indiana House Speaker Brian Bosma (R-Indianapolis) says he’s “disturbed” previous administrations ignored reports on the Department of Child Services.

Democratic lawmakers question whether this time will be different.

Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky and the ACLU of Indiana are cheering a recent decision halting a provision of a new Indiana abortion law from taking effect Sunday. A federal judge halted the law, saying it was likely too vague to enforce.

Judge Halts Indiana's Latest Anti-Abortion Law

Jun 29, 2018
A federal judge says Indiana’s latest anti-abortion law is likely too vague to enforce. (Lauren Chapman/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

A federal judge says Indiana’s latest anti-abortion law is likely too vague to enforce.

The judge Thursday temporarily halted the state’s new abortion complication reporting law from taking effect.

From left, ACLU of Indiana's Gavin Rose, Exodus Refugee Immigration's Sara Hindi, and Muslim Alliance of Indiana's Aliya Amin discuss the Supreme Court's decision on Pres. Trump's Muslim travel ban. (Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Indiana Muslim and refugee organization leaders say they’re disappointed the Supreme Court upheld President Donald Trump’s ban on travel from several predominantly Muslim nations.

The groups say despite what the court ruled, the ban is a "racist and discriminatory policy.”

Redistricting reform advocates pack the Indiana House Chamber during a 2017 committee hearing. (Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Indiana redistricting reform advocates say they’re disappointed and a bit deflated by the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decisions in two major cases on partisan gerrymandering.

Indiana National Guard soldiers are issued equipment at Camp Atterbury. (Indiana National Guard)
Brandon Smith

Gov. Eric Holcomb’s office says there are no Indiana National Guards troops currently on the ground at the  southern border of the United States  – “and no plan to send troops, either.”

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