Health

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

It’s now illegal to vape, or smoke an electronic cigarette – in most public places in Lafayette. One local vaping shop believes smoking traditional cigarettes and vaping shouldn’t be conflated.

Vaping devices heat “e-liquids” containing nicotine—the amount of which can be customized—and flavors, like cinnamon or berry. Users produce large billows of vapor when exhaling. Zachary Gracer works at West Lafayette’s 7 Sins Vape shop, and says his customers are respectful.

Mark Simons / Purdue University

A Purdue University research project aims to identify early autism markers through telemedicine.

The research, led by Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology at Purdue University Bridgette Tonnsen, will focus on infants and toddlers with neurogenetic disorders like Fragile X that co-occurs with autism.

"My goal is to understand what are the early risk factors for autism and Fragile X and are those similar or different from those we are detecting in those other high-risk groups?" Tonnsen says.

Safe Gun Storage Lags In Homes With Children

Mar 2, 2018
Courtesy of Riley Hospital IU Health

An estimated 39 percent of Hoosiers have firearms and a new study find many of those guns are not stored properly.

A report published in the Journal Pediatrics states only an estimated one third of Indiana households with guns store them safely.

The report from the American Academy of Pediatrics specifically asked for the mental health history of children in the home and if firearms are stored locked and unloaded.

Jill Sheridan / IPB News

A multi-state study to examine early on-set Alzheimer’s will launch soon, and it’s based at Indiana University’s School of Medicine. The Longitudinal Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease or LEADS, is the first, large scale clinical trial to research the disease.

Dr. Liana Apostolova was joined by co-researchers in Indianapolis this week as the study gets underway. The National Institutes of Health awarded the group $7.6 million to research early onset Alzheimer’s.

Bill Would Develop Plan To Reduce Diabetes Rate

Feb 27, 2018
Jill Sheridan / IPB News

More than 11-percent of Hoosiers have diabetes and a proposal to outline the impact of the disease is making its way through the Indiana General Assembly.

The bill would require the state health department and Indiana Family and Social Services Agency to develop a strategy to reduce the prevalence of diabetes in the state.

Diabetes educator Jasmine Gonzalvo says Indiana Medicaid spent more than $10 billion addressing diabetes in one five-year period.

Lauren Chapman / IPBS

A new analysis finds the combined rates of drug, alcohol and suicide deaths is higher than predicted. In Indiana there was a 12 percent increase in these fatalities.

The report from Trust for America’s Health, a non-profit policy organization, finds in the category of drug deaths, Indiana’s rate rose 20 percent from 2015-2016. That’s more than 1,500 Hoosiers, a record high.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

Tippecanoe County Health Department officials report a 93-percent syringe return rate among recurring participants during the first six months of the county’s needle exchange program.

A total of 138 people – most between the ages of 30 and 40 – have participated. The department has distributed about 11,000 needles in that time.

County Health Officer Jeremy Adler says the department has also focused on connecting participants with resources including substance abuse treatment, mental health services and Hepatitis C and HIV testing.

Tim Evanson / Wikimedia Commons

About 11-percent of Hoosiers have diabetes and an estimated third of the state has pre-diabetes.  A new start-up company will breed a rare type of pig used to study diabetes treatments and look for a cure.

The new business partnership between Purdue University and Indiana University School of Medicine scientists will produce the Ossabaw pigs which are predisposed to diabetes.

Maternal Mortality Bill Moves Forward

Feb 16, 2018
Pixabay

A bill to create a maternal mortality review committee passed a House committee this week. It seeks to determine the reason for Indiana's high maternal mortality rate – when a mother dies during pregnancy or in childbirth.

These rates are on the rise in many states, including Indiana. Sen. Jean Leising (R-Oldenburg) proposed a bill this session to investigate the cause.

"Our death rate for moms having babies in our state is twice that of the national average," says Leising.

House Committee Hears Testimony On Sex Education Bill

Feb 16, 2018
Jill Sheridan / IPB News

The House Education Committee heard testimony Thursday on a bill that would require schools to make sex education instructional materials available to parents and require parents to opt-in to instruction.

Monica Boyer, president of the Indiana Liberty Coalition, says the bill allows parents to protect their children from information about people who identify as transgender specifically or LGBTQ.

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