Indiana Manufactuers Association

Indiana Manufacturers Association President and CEO Brian Burton presents at the regional summit held at Subaru in Lafayette. (Samantha Horton/IPB News)
Samantha Horton

Indiana Manufacturers Association visited Subaru in Lafayette Thursday, one of the several stops around the state meeting with manufacturers.

James Vavrek / WFIU/WTIU News

 

The Indiana Department of Workforce Development estimates there will be more than one million jobs to fill in the state by 2024 – and most of them won’t require a college degree.

Instead, many employers will be looking for highly-skilled workers with specialized certificates to fill positions in everything from manufacturing to healthcare.

Gov. Eric Holcomb signs workforce bills with Indiana lawmakers and other state lawmakers and business leaders. (Samantha Horton/IPB News)
Lauren Chapman

Gov. Eric Holcomb signed both workforce development bills passed during the 2018 session into law Wednesday.

"It’s addressing the needs of yes the employers, but of our citizens," says Holcomb. "That’s the why we are doing this. We are addressing the needs of the people of the State of Indiana.”

(Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Lauren Chapman

Though workforce development was perhaps the highest-priority issue for Gov. Eric Holcomb in this year’s legislative session, some are not sold on the two key pieces of legislation passed by Wednesday night’s deadline.

Stakeholders in Indiana are already weighing the GOP tax plan’s potential effect on workers.

Indiana Manufacturers Association lobbyist Andrew Berger says the plan’s most important pillar is its 20 percent corporate tax rate. He says it’ll let businesses make decisions about growing and investing based on what really matters.

“Not, ‘how do I best effectuate my tax liability?’” he says. “That’s what we’re trying to get out of this investment decision-making process.”

President Donald Trump is touting a new survey from the National Association of Manufacturers that shows record optimism among American factory owners – a rosier picture than a similar Indiana survey painted last fall.

A new report from the Indiana Commission for Higher Education says a rising number of people are getting educational certificates from two-year Indiana colleges, which may help fill the state’s open manufacturing jobs.

The CHE report focuses on credit-bearing certificates – the kind college students can earn in less than one or two years, from programs that “commonly have a career or occupational focus.”

In Indiana, CHE found a 32 percent increase in production of these certificates since 2012, mostly from two-year public schools like Ivy Tech Community College.

 

Gov. Eric Holcomb told Indiana factory owners Wednesday that he and the state legislature will do more this year to help find and train new workers.

At the Indiana Manufacturers Association’s annual legislative briefing, Holcomb said he knows factories are struggling to find enough qualified employees.

Toyota Motor Manufacturing of Indiana

 

Growth in Indiana's manufacturing industry is slowing down, thanks to over-regulation and a lack of skilled workers.

That's the message from businesses that weighed in for a big annual survey on the health of the Hoosier manufacturing sector.

It's prepared by Indianapolis accounting firm Katz, Sapper & Miller, working with researchers at Indiana University, the Indiana Manufacturers' Association and Conexus Indiana.

 

GM To Spend $90M Upgrading Marion Plant

Aug 22, 2016
GM

General Motors will invest $90 million to upgrade its Marion Metal Center in Grant County, the company announced Monday.

 

The money will pay for new, high-tech equipment at the 60-year-old facility where the company employs about 1,400 people, supplying metal parts for GM vehicles across North America.

 

It's the largest investment the Indiana Economic Development Corporation has announced since late May.

 

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