Indiana State Board of Education

Officials have finally released results for the state’s standardized test, the ISTEP, after grading issues postponed their publication last month.

The State Board of Education plans to take a closer look at virtual charter schools. Members approved a new committee at their meeting Wednesday to review and make policy recommendations around virtual schools.

Dr. Byron Ernest is the secretary of the Indiana State Board of Education. (Eric Weddle/WFYI News)
Jeanie Lindsay

Changes to education in Indiana are coming over the next two years with new standardized tests and federal education law, but members of the State Board of Education plan to postpone another shift around school accountability.

Lauren Chapman / IPB News

The state’s top education official plans to push for more policy and funding to improve school safety.

State officials and lawmakers say Indiana has strong school safety programs in place, but Superintendent of Public Instruction Jennifer McCormick says there are still gaps.

State Board Approves School Grading System Proposal

Jan 10, 2018

Significant changes are in store for the state’s school grading system, but the State Board of Education had trouble finding a starting point at its first meeting of 2018.

The State Department of Education worked on a new education plan last year due to the federal Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA. That included possible changes to the way Indiana grades schools, but at their monthly meeting Wednesday, the Board of Education approved a plan with some key differences.

A state committee recommended sweeping changes to high school graduation requirements Tuesday even as many of the details remain unknown.

If approved by the State Board of Education students, starting with the class of 2023, would choose from multiple academic tracts to satisfy three graduation requirements that are designed to better prepare them for college or career.

The State Board of Education approved school corporation A-F letter grades Wednesday for the 2016-2017 school year.

Of the state 289 school corporations 48 earned an A on for 2017. That’s more than double the number of districts that earned the top grade last year – 23 corporations.

Of the districts assigned 2017 grades: 149 assigned B; 63 assigned C; Six assigned; One assigned F.

Members of a State Board of Education committee tasked with proposing new ways for students to qualify for graduation began sketching their plan Tuesday.

There’s still a lot for the dozen-plus members to sort out before their last meeting next month.

But a list of nine alternative ways students could become eligible for a diploma has begun to take shape. It includes: earning industry-recognized credentials; passing the military entrance exam plus enlisting; and work-based learning with job experience.

The board of the chronically failing Hoosier Academies Virtual School voted Tuesday not to seek renewal of their charter, a decision that will cause the school of 2,000 students to close in June.

John Marske, Hoosier Academies board president, told WFYI News in an email Wednesday that the school had until Oct. 1 to submit a renewal application.

Gov. Eric Holcomb filled two vacant spots on the State Board of Education, appointing Kathleen Mote and previous board member Tony Walker.

Mote is from Madison and is the current intermin chancellor for Ivy Tech Community College’s Columbus/Southeast Region. She replaces Lee Ann Kwiatkowski, who resigned her position to work as state superintendent Jennifer McCormick’s chief of staff.

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