John Dennis

City of West Lafayette

 

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we’re going back to school. School shootings have dominated the headlines over the past year, and the state of Indiana is supplying free handheld metal detectors to schools who request them--but will the West Lafayette School Corporation sign on? What’s the best way to ensure safety, with an awareness of gun violence heightened after the Noblesville shooting in May?

City of West Lafayette

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we’re digging into West Lafayette’s growing pains. One of the city's roundabout projects just won an award, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t complaints. And, the city is gearing up for several more development projects both downtown and near the local airport. So how does a city maintain – or shape a new – identity when so much of the past has to be torn down?

Markus Spiering / https://www.flickr.com/photos/spierisf/11372319394

Though West Lafayette leaders are thinking of changing the rules for how often rental units are inspected and how much landlords are charged for those properties, the man in charge of the process says a reason outlined in the ordinance isn’t much of a concern.

A revised ordinance up for consideration by the City Council cites what it calls “widespread problems with overoccupancy of rental housing” as a reason to rewrite the law.

Eric Norris / flickr.com/photos/sfxeric/3964596491

West Lafayette is gearing up to sue opioid manufacturers and distributors – joining a long list of U.S. cities going after painkiller producers in the courtroom.

More than a dozen manufacturers are to be named in the lawsuit, including Johnson & Johnson, Allergan and Purdue Pharma. They’re some of the companies responsible for such drugs as Norco and Oxycontin. The city will allege those companies, in its words, “deceptively marketed” opioids.

Opiate distributors will also be named in the lawsuit, alleging those parties failed to report and stop high-quantity orders.

City of West Lafayette

West Lafayette Mayor John Dennis has talked frequently about how what he calls “market forces” dictate which stores and shops locate in his city, more than any recruitment effort ever could.

So as the city council tries to grapple with the impending closure of the only full-service grocery store on the Purdue campus, we’ll ask Mayor Dennis what that says about an area whose economy is supposed to be booming.

Quinn Dombrowski / https://www.flickr.com/photos/quinnanya/

The West Lafayette City Council approved plans Monday to set physical and operational boundaries for new businesses along the Wabash River.

The so-called “riverfront” district now expands past River Road, up State Street and along Fowler Avenue. The council voted to support applications for liquor licenses in the district so long as the business' sales are at least 67-percent food (i.e. not more than one-third alcohol) or it stays open no longer than from 11 a.m. to midnight.

City of West Lafayette

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor with West Lafayette’s John Dennis, we talk about things getting thrown away.

A listener wants to know how recycling in the city really works – can he be sure his plastic bottles are going to a landfill?

Also, there’s new data about the county’s syringe exchange program, which Mayor Dennis is against, along with his police chief and their counterparts across the river. About half the needles given out so far haven’t come back. So where are they ending up?

city of West Lafayette

West Lafayette’s mayor wants to give people more places to have an adult beverage – as long as those new establishments follow some stricter rules than most West Lafayette bars currently do.

It’s allowed under a law in which mayors whose cities have so-called “riverfront districts” – as Lafayette and West Lafayette do – can authorize liquor licenses.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

The city of West Lafayette has canceled its plan to block off State Street and Northwestern Avenue after blowback from local businesses.

After the announcement of the closure, dozens of State Street business owners signed a petition to stop the closures that would’ve taken place on Purdue’s homecoming game day.

The owners, including John von Erdmannsdorff of Von’s Shops, say it would’ve made customers avoid the area.

He says it would be plausible for a special outdoor event like a festival, but not for Purdue’s homecoming football game.

City of West Lafayette

West Lafayette’s State Street partially reopened, on time, last month, and drivers have begun getting used to the new traffic patterns.

They’ve had a lot of time to do that because the new architecture leaves them idling in the road for much longer than the old setup did.

Pages