Law and Criminal Justice

(WFIU/WTIU News)

 

Law enforcement officials say they’ve arrested a 17-year-old suspect in connection to a string of church vandalism across Brown and Bartholomew counties last summer. And police say the juvenile is the same person suspected of vandalism at a Carmel synagogue in July.

When police seize illegal drugs, those drugs must be identified and weighed. The Indiana State Police now have an estimated 6,000 case backlog for drug analysis. Testing for cases is delayed by as much as six months, but the state’s forensics director says it’s not a problem – yet.

Indiana State Police Forensic Analysis Director Eric Lawrence says there are more drug cases filed, and new synthetic drugs are added to the list of controlled substances.

“And that in and of itself makes the analysis more complicated and more time consuming,” Lawrence says.

Nolan Brewer, a 20-year-old man from Cloverdale, Indiana, has been arrested and charged for the Nazi graffiti found at a Carmel synagogue in July.

A co-conspirator was also arrested, and remains in custody. U.S. Attorney Josh Minkler says the investigation is ongoing and gave no details about the co-conspirator, but he says the person is a juvenile.

Minkler says local and federal investigators received numerous tips about the crime, which led them to Brewer.

National Judicial Drug Task Force Meets In Indy

Jun 5, 2018
Indiana Chief Justice Loretta Rush (left) is the co-chair of the National Judicial Opioid Task Force. (Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Indiana Chief Justice Loretta Rush says judicial leaders from around the country feel a sense of urgency as they develop an infrastructure for court systems to address the nation’s opioid crisis.

Courtesy Frankfort Police Department / Facebook

Despite Frankfort Mayor Chris McBarnes’ recent statement suggesting metal detectors would be installed at Frankfort Community Schools, city officials say they probably won’t be added in the immediate future.

Frankfort Assistant Superintendent Joel McKinney says no final decisions have been made. But the district is leaning toward adding more school resource officers first.

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Barbara Anguiano / WVPE

The St. Joseph County Prosecutor’s Office today released the review results of nearly 400 untested Sexual Assault Examination Kits or SAEKs. The review comes after an Indiana State Police audit of untested kits in every county in December 2017.

 

WFIU/WTIU News

Police departments are increasingly using algorithms to predict crime, and a study from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis aims to address concerns that these algorithms are racially biased.

It’s a method called predictive policing. A computer algorithm looks at data, including crime rates, and predicts where crime is likely to happen. Police departments then increase patrols in those areas.

But some groups criticize the technology, saying it reinforces racial bias in policing.

Tex Texin / flickr.com/photos/textexin/3612094774

In March, the Frankfort Police Department will begin to treat every drug overdose as a crime scene in an effort to find and convict drug dealers.

According to new overdose guidelines, officers will first respond to the overdose in a medical sense. And if an opioid was involved, they’ll administer the overdose-reversal drug naloxone.

Then, officers will collect evidence and statements from the scene to help build criminal cases against drug dealers.

Deputy Chief Scott Shoemaker says he’s confident most victims won’t cooperate, so police will dig deeper.

https://tippecanoein.gtlvisitme.com/app

Law enforcement officials are revamping the Tippecanoe County jail’s visitation system, beginning next week.

A web portal will allow scheduling of onsite visits with an inmate and a remote visit function, via a Skype-like video feed. A video-chat will cost $4 for ten minutes or $10 for 25 minutes. Visitors can register a “visit” online or via kiosk in the department lobby.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

Many Indiana county jails struggle with overcrowding, so a common practice is to transfer inmates to another jail that has available space. That process can cost local law enforcement thousands of dollars a month, as sheriffs are effectively renting cell space from each other.

In Wabash County Sheriff Bob Land’s office, there’s a sign hanging above his desk that reads, "We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking that created them."

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