mental health

A few Indiana school corporations will divvy up $9 million to improve mental health support, and while the number of schools receiving the money may be small, officials say they’ll influence efforts across the state.

Mental Wellness Focus At First Responder Conference

Sep 14, 2018
Brandon Dreiman led a session on mental health at the annual Indiana Emergency Response Conference. (Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
Jill Sheridan

The annual Indiana Emergency Response Conference was held in Indianapolis and mental health was the focus during a number of sessions.

One in five American children has or will have a serious mental illness - and at least half of them won’t get treatment. (WFIU/WTIU)
Brandon Smith

One in five American children has or will have a serious mental illness – and at least half of them won’t get treatment.

The Indiana Commission on Improving the Status of Children wants every school district in the state to have personnel to help integrate what’s called social emotional learning into the classroom – essentially, education that improves mental health.

Gun violence is now recognized as a public health issue in Indianapolis, after the City County Council passed a non-binding resolution. 

Ahmad Moore came to support the proposal with his daughter and members of his church. He says violence is a real problem in the city. 

"If you don’t be the change, if you don’t make your voice heard, then you’re basically saying that you agree with the way things are," says Moorie. 

The group responsible for Indiana’s school safety report says the state needs to improve mental health services and data sharing to keep kids safe.

Noblesville Schools will ask voters this Fall to nearly double a current property tax rate to expand safety measures in the wake of the school shooting there in May.

Tuesday the school board voted to seek $6.25 million a year in additional general operations funding for the next eight years, for a total of $50 million.

The current operating referendum tax rate is 18.9 cents per $100 of assessed value. Voters approved that rate in 2016. The proposed referendum would replace the 18.9 cents rate with a new rate of 37 cents per $100 of assessed value.

Courtesy Purdue University

A patient’s self-evaluation of mental health problems may be more accurate than previously thought according to new research out of Purdue University. 

Past studies indicate patient and therapist diagnoses of personality disorders do not align.  But this new study found different results when patients and providers had the same diagnostic tool.

Lead author and Purdue professor Doug Samuels says patients and providers identified many of the same symptoms at the similar places on a personality assessment scale.

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

Gia Bradford has some words of hard-earned advice she’d give her freshman year self, if she could.

“I would take the SATs earlier,” says Bradford.

Bradford is a senior at West Lafayette High School. She and her fellow seniors are in the last months of their high school careers, so they’re starting to relax a little. But the past four years haven’t been worry-free.

The Indiana Commission On Improving the Status of Children is working to tackle one part of the shortage of mental health providers.

Indiana Association of Resources and Child Advocacy executive director Cathleen Graham says the shortage of professionals comes from a number of factors: Indiana has almost doubled the number of children in the welfare system and the opioid epidemic contributed to longer stays in the system while parents and guardians get sober.

A record number of stakeholders from around Indiana met to learn about the state’s progress and challenges in the field of mental health and addiction.

Indiana’s annual Mental Health Symposium began 20 years ago. Indiana University Institute of Psychiatric Research director John Nurnberger helped organize from the start. He says while there’s greater mental health awareness in Indiana – stigma is still a major barrier.

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