opioid epidemic

The discovery of a new drug compound could lead to non-opioid pain medication. 

Event Provides Overdose Reversal Drug, Training

Sep 28, 2018
Free naloxone was distributed at the event at IUPUI. (Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
Lauren Chapman

The public had an opportunity to learn to administer the overdose reversal drug naloxone in Indianapolis. The event was held simultaneously at four public libraries in the city.

Indiana will receive more than $18 million a year, for two years to address the opioid epidemic. The funds are part of a $1 billion package announced this week by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or HHS.

Hundreds from around the state attended the event in Hamilton County. (Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
Lauren Chapman

Public health and public safety leaders gathered in Carmel to find ways to collaborate to address the opioid epidemic in Hoosier communities.

Indiana State Department of Health Commissioner Kristina Box says many are responding to the addiction crisis in Indiana.

U.S. Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.) says he’s hopeful the Senate will vote in August on comprehensive opioid addiction treatment legislation. (Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.) says he’s hopeful the Senate will vote in August on comprehensive opioid addiction treatment legislation.

Young met with local stakeholders to discuss ways to address the state’s opioid crisis.

Nearly 1,000 people attended the Statewide Opioid Summit in Indianapolis. (Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
Lauren Chapman

The Statewide Opioid Summit focused on the intersection of addiction and the justice systemand highlighted Medication-Assisted Treatment.

Statewide Partnership Aims To Reduce Opioid Addiction

Jul 24, 2018
Indiana Sen. Jim Merritt (R-Indianapolis) announces RALI Indiana coalition. (Photo courtesy of Bose Public Affairs)
Jill Sheridan

A new statewide coalition of business and health leaders will work to align resources and education to drive down opioid addiction across the state.   

Hospital birthing room. (Becca Costello/WFIU)
Jill Sheridan

A new program to help women who are addicted to opioids and their newborn babies will launch in Indianapolis and aims to fill a gap in treatment services.

The Richard M. Fairbanks Foundation is granting more than $840,000 to address the problem. President and CEO Claire Fiddian-Green says Care Plus is patient-focused.

(File Photo: U.S. Department of Agriculture)
(File Photo: U.S. Department of Agriculture)

Besides support for farmers and agricultural efforts, the recently passed Farm Bill also addresses the opioid epidemic in rural communities.

Funds to increase telemedicine treatment and training options will be available through the bill. 

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

As the opioid epidemic rages on across the country, Indiana researchers are among those rethinking pain management.

But non-opioid medication has fallen short for those with chronic pain.

When you’re hurt, your nervous system sends a signal to your brain and you feel pain. Most pain medications mask the pain by blocking the receptors that cause you to feel it.

According to Richard van Rijn – a Purdue University medicinal chemist and molecular pharmacologist – the right type of medication depends on the type of pain. He says for chronic pain, it’s hard to find effective medication.

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