News

Indiana Cemeteries Grapple With Funding Challenges

Aug 13, 2019
Barbara Brosher / WFIU/WTIU News

 

When people buy a plot at a cemetery, they assume their final resting place will be taken care of forever.

But cemeteries across the state are struggling financially, because the one-time fees people pay for burials don’t cover the costs of never-ending maintenance.

That’s forcing cemeteries to change their business models, and even sparking a change in law.

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

Purdue researchers are investigating the viability of solar power production on farmland, hoping their work in so-called “aglectric” engineering will balance food and energy production.

Chemical engineering professor Rakesh Agrawal says merging the footprint of the two helps mitigate issues presented by a shortage of available empty land.

“The idea is to have energy at low cost, and plentiful everywhere,” Agrawal says. “So we get out of the fossils, and it will change the way we live.”      

Courtesy City of Bloomington Facebook Page

Bloomington’s mayor says the city is considering several options when it comes to addressing rising tensions at the farmers’ market over the presence of a vendor with alleged white supremacist ties, but he didn’t mention any specifics. 

The city won’t announce plans for reopening the farmers’ market after a two-week suspension until Tuesday, but did take questions about the market during a Facebook discussion.

Book Review: End of the Megafauna

Aug 9, 2019

Could you imagine gorilla-sized lemurs, 500-pound birds, and giant lizards? This isn’t science fiction, it’s our natural history. End of the Megafauna explores the inexplicable death of the huge creatures that roamed the Earth at a time period that overlaps with our own human existence. Was it climate change? Did humans kill these massive creatures? West Lafayette Library Director Nick Schenkel has the review.

Muncie Student Arrested With Gun Across From High School

Aug 8, 2019
File Photo: StateImpact Indiana

Police in Muncie say they arrested a 15-year-old student with a gun across the street from the city’s high school on Wednesday afternoon.  Indiana Public Broadcasting's Stephanie Wiechmann reports.

File Photo: WFIU/WTIU News

Indiana University Bloomington Provost Lauren Robel sent an email to the campus community Tuesday saying groundskeepers found five flyers purporting to be from the Ku Klux Klan. The email says they were identical to "neighborhood watch" flyers residents found throughout Bloomington Monday. 

The email says IU Police are investigating. They're working with Bloomington and state police. 

The phone number listed on the bottom of a Ku Klux Klan flyer distributed throughout Bloomington Monday is linked to a lawsuit filed by a man who was injured while protesting the 2017 ‘Unite the Right’ rally in Charlottesville.

Court documents say Bill Burke of Athens, Ohio was among 35 people injured after James Fields Jr. drove his car through a crowd of protestors. One woman died during the attack.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Loeb Stadium opened in 1940 and played host to five summer league and professional franchises, as well as hosting the Colt World Series and Jefferson High School home games. The Aviators are slated to be the first tenants in its successor, which will see the playing surface get an about-face and be sunk into the ground before “play ball” is called in summer of 2021.

For months, Purdue faculty have sparred with President Mitch Daniels about his desire to make passing a civics test a graduation requirement – even if both sides broadly agree students don’t know enough about government.

Next week, incoming freshmen will set the baseline for what Purdue students know by taking a voluntary questionnaire as part of Boiler Gold Rush, Purdue’s orientation program. WBAA’s Stan Jastrzebski sat down with Purdue Senate Chair Cheryl Cooky to find out about the test – which was still being written with less than a week before students arrive, and which she’s hesitant to call a “test.”

Taylor Haggerty / WBAA News

It will be at least a week before officials conclude an investigation into the cause of a fire at a Frankfort recycling plant.

Assistant Fire Chief Ed Cripe says the Frankfort Fire Department has two members investigating, along with a private investigator brought in by Werner and Son Recycling. He says they’re still reviewing video surveillance and conducting interviews.

The city street department is still collecting recycling in place of Werner and Son. They will continue to collect from one quadrant of the city at a time until the regular weekly schedule can resume.

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