Stan Jastrzebski

News Director

Stan Jastrzebski has spent a career in radio, with postings as News Director of NPR member stations WFSU in Tallahassee, Fla. and WFIU in Bloomington, Ind., and time as a reporter at WGN Radio in Chicago and WIBC Radio in Indianapolis. 

Stan holds a master’s degree in broadcast journalism from Northwestern University and has won awards from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Associated Press, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated, the Radio Television Digital News Association and the Indiana Broadcasters Association. 

He spends his time away from the newsroom with his wife and daughter and enjoys board games, tennis and trivia competitions.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

For some, the definition of free speech is that while one person may find another’s statement disagreeable, that doesn’t diminish the right to make that statement.

And so Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski is in a bit of a pickle regarding another drop of KKK flyers in his city. Does he speak out and raise the city’s profile on the issue of racism, or decline to give attention to the litterers and hope they’ll go away when they don’t get much traction?

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

WBAA's three-person newsroom was busy in 2019, spending much of its time on in-depth reporting.

We made a conscious effort to tell more stories from rural communities outlying Greater Lafayette than we had in the past, and it painted a rich, if sometimes complicated, picture of our neighbors.

courtesy Lafayettelimo.com

UPDATE (1:50 p.m.):

Lafayette Limo General Manager Amanda Florian says five buses were destroyed and another slightly damaged in the Dec. 30 fire.

That leaves the company with only three of its nine full-size buses in service, but Florian says the company has a total fleet of around 40 vehicles of varying sizes.

"So far, we're doing good. It's not necessarily the ideal time for it to happen, because obviously [Purdue University] students are returning next week," Florian says.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

t’s getting harder for leaders of Indiana cities to predict how much their municipal construction projects are going to cost. A lack of trained workers in the state has left construction firms in high demand – and with the ability to charge rates much higher than in the past. So as the City of West Lafayette signs off on documents proclaiming its renovation of the Morton Center into its new city hall will cost $13 million, how much can those numbers really be trusted?

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

It’s been a year of raucous debate in Montgomery County – about wind farms, confined feeding operations and about the lawmakers who make the decisions. Much of it is separate from the workings of the city of Crawfordsville, but it has an effect on the way public discourse is conducted throughout the county.

This week, on our last Ask The Mayor program of 2019, we talk to Crawfordsville Mayor Todd Barton about the tone of those talks and about whether such business needs to be put to bed more quickly.

courtesy City of Frankfort

While Frankfort leaders are hoping to draw more people to the area this holiday season for winter festivities, they’re also faced with a problem: where all those people are going to park, especially as year-round residents get frosty about wanting to share those same spaces.

So on this week’s Ask The Mayor program, we’ll chat with Chris McBarnes about what his city’s remedy might be. Some cities have installed parking meters, while others, such as Lafayette and West Lafayette, have chosen more passive – but more costly – forms of enforcement.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

On last month’s conversation with Purdue President Mitch Daniels, we chatted about the way the school is now tracking incidents involving electric scooters and motorized skateboards. Now, the school has convened a task force to determine whether new rules need to be made regarding their use – to keep both riders and drivers safer.

We cover that on this edition of WBAA’s Monthly Conversation with Mitch Daniels, as well as how the school’s interest in bulking up its contracts with global defense companies aligns with a newly-announced directive by Governor Eric Holcomb to triple the number of federal dollars coming to Indiana for defense.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

PILOTS WANTED 

Earlier this year, Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenberg told CNBC his company projects the aviation industry will need to find some 800,000 new pilots in the next 20 years. That's as retirements by current pilots are expected to escalate and new tech comes online for which additional training will be needed.

That could make it a seller’s market for those just coming out of flight school.

There are a couple main ways in basketball to take a three-point shot.

One is the way Purdue's men's basketball team did it all too often in a messy loss Sunday at Nebraska -- settling for an outside look when the team is not shooting well and when an interior shot against smaller defenders is a much higher percentage play.

The second is the way Purdue did it Tuesday against the Ohio University Bobcats -- using offensive motion to open up easy shots and (at least in the first half) knock them down.

Lauren Chapman / IPB News

Among the bills Greater Lafayette State House members are pondering in the upcoming Indiana lawmaking session are ones that tackle some pressing health issues facing the state.

VAPING 

State Representative Sheila Klinker (D-Lafayette) says she’s planning to write a bill for the upcoming legislative session that attempts to tackle one of Governor Eric Holcomb’s top priorities: reducing vaping.

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