2016 Presidential Race

Barbara Brosher/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Governor Mike Pence got his chance Tuesday to sound vice presidential for Donald Trump as the Republican presidential candidate’s decision on a running mate approaches.

The two met in Indianapolis earlier in the day, prior to a private fundraiser.

Pence was effusive in his praise for Trump at the Republican presidential hopeful’s rally in Westfield.

Pence declared to a crowd of more than a thousand that Trump “gets it” and hears the voice of Americans.

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One of Northwest Indiana's biggest employers wants to ban Chinese steel from the American market.

In a complaint with the International Trade Commission, U.S. Steel says Chinese imports are hurting jobs in places like Indiana -- where steel was also a hot topic on the campaign trail.

Gage Skidmore / https://www.flickr.com/photos/gageskidmore/8571618966

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) is challenging Donald Trump's foreign-policy credentials as the Indiana primary draws closer.

Both Cruz and Trump have touted a bombs-away approach to ISIS, with Cruz saying he'd like to find out "whether sand glows in the dark" and Trump saying he'd "bomb the ---- out of them."

Cruz says Trump’s answer to a foreign policy question only makes matters worse.

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Presidential candidates have blanketed Indiana over the last couple of weeks, seeking to secure as many delegates as possible in the hunt for their parties’ nomination.

Here's how Republican and Democratic delegates are doled out based on Tuesday’s results:

Indiana has 57 Republican delegates up for grabs.  Thirty of those delegates will vote for the statewide winner on the first ballot at the Republican National Convention. 

Annie Ropeik/Indiana Public Broadcasting

As many as a thousand union members and supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders rallied outside the Indiana Statehouse Friday in support of laid-off Carrier factory workers.

Sanders' last-minute appearance at the protest came days before Tuesday's primary election, where the Carrier story has taken center stage.

The diverse crowd on the statehouse lawn wielded signs reading "Keep it made in America" and "Save our jobs, stop corporate greed," and chanted union slogans like "stand up, fight back."

Ted Cruz campaign

Gov. Mike Pence Friday announced his endorsement of Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX), just four days before Indiana’s primary.  Pence was quick to add the caveat that he’ll support whoever the Republican nominee is this fall.

Pence calls Cruz a “principled conservative” who is willing to stand up to party leadership to defend his convictions. 

The governor says he’s not worried his endorsement will alienate some Republican voters.

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While Hillary Clinton campaigned in Northern Indiana Tuesday, her husband Bill Clinton spoke at an event in Indianapolis.

The former Democratic U.S. President says Hillary Clinton has the most realistic plan to fix the country’s economic problems.

His speech focused on income inequality, student debt and terrorism.

In an apparent appeal to supporters of Democratic rival Bernie Sanders, Clinton says Hillary Clinton’s economic plan involves giving companies a 15 percent tax credit if they share their profits fairly.

Nadya Peek / https://www.flickr.com/photos/nadya/2977614168

Indiana’s high absentee voter turnout may signal a large primary turnout on May 3. Indiana voters have submitted around 119,000 absentee requests so far -- that's about as many total absentee ballots were cast four years ago.

Indiana Election Division co-director Angie Nussmeyer says 2008 set the standard for Indiana turnout. She says around 185,000 Hoosiers voted absentee in the 2008 primary.

Nussmeyer says this election’s bounce-back may stem from heightened political interest and increasing absentee ballot awareness.

Gage Skidmore / https://www.flickr.com/photos/gageskidmore/8571618966

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) says he’s entirely focused on Indiana and what he calls his “head-to-head contest” with Donald Trump. Cruz spent Monday traveling across the Hoosier State after he and Gov. John Kasich (R-OH) announced a coordinated plan to prevent Trump from getting the GOP nomination.

Cruz spent Monday throughout southern and central Indiana, his third consecutive day in the state.  That comes as he shifts his resources to the Hoosier State and away from primaries in Oregon and New Mexico. 

Gage Skidmore / https://www.flickr.com/photos/gageskidmore/6183902205

It's not just Ted Cruz, John Kasich and Donald Trump in Indiana.

There was also a visit this week from Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson.

He's the former governor of New Mexico and is suing the Presidential Debate Commission.

Johnson says the Commission keeps the debates exclusive.

“At the heart of what’s wrong with presidential politics is the Presidential Debate Commission, made up of Democrats and Republicans,” he says. “They collude with one another to exclude everybody else.”

Johnson last ran for president in 2012.

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