abortion

A Planned Parenthood clinic in northwest Indiana has halted abortions because of a state law that involves doctors’ admitting privileges marking the first time the state has used the law to stop services.

In a letter earlier this month the Indiana State Department of Health told the Merrillville Planned Parenthood to stop performing abortions because a doctor with admitting privileges had ended their relationship with the clinic.

A judge’s ruling halting parts of the state’s new anti-abortion law is, in the words of retiring Indiana Planned Parenthood CEO Betty Cockrum, a “fine last hurrah” for her.

An anti-abortion group is criticizing a decline in Planned Parenthood’s services and clients over the last decade. The attack comes as the number of abortions increased slightly.

The number of patients at Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky is down about 50 percent since 2007. The organization went from 35 clinics to 17 in that time.

Indiana Right to Life president Mike Fichter says that’s proof the organization is failing.

Planned Parenthood wants a court to halt portions of a new Indiana abortion law. It’s the fifth lawsuit over abortion legislation in seven years.

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Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill is appealing the federal ruling against a state law requiring women to wait at least 18 hours between an ultrasound and an abortion.

Women in Indiana no longer have to wait at least 18 hours between an ultrasound and an abortion after a recent court ruling halting part of last year’s controversial abortion law.

A House committee changed a bill that deals with parental notification of abortion, aiming to alleviate the biggest concerns surrounding the controversial bill.

Under current law, a girl under 18 can go to court to get consent for an abortion if her parents won’t grant it. Proposed legislation would have required at least one parent be notified of that hearing – raising concerns about its confidentiality.

 

The Indiana Senate made changes to a parental consent for abortion bill that supporters say they hope the changes fix the bill’s issues.

The bill requires parents or guardians be notified if their underage daughter goes to court to get consent for an abortion.

Current law already requires parental consent for anyone under 18 to get an abortion. If a child doesn’t want to get their parents’ permission, they can go to court to get a waiver.

 

Indiana House lawmakers passed a bill Monday requiring doctors to inform women their drug-induced abortions could be reversed – and also to say there’s no scientific study to support that claim.

The vote for the measure, authored by Rep. Ron Bacon (R-Boonville), came over bipartisan opposition.

Abortion Bill Changed After Returning To Committee

Feb 21, 2017

 

A House committee altered and then approved an abortion regulation bill after the unusual step of sending the bill from the House floor back to the committee.

The bill mandates doctors tell patients their medication-induced abortions could be reversed. It also mandates doctors tell patients that no scientifically valid studies verify that practice.

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