Addiction

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

U.S. Surgeon General – and former Indiana Health Commissioner – Jerome Adams says additional screenings could offer Indiana college students more information about their potential for drug overdose and addiction.

Speaking Monday at Purdue University, Adams talked about what he called his own family’s genetic predisposition to addiction, and suggested that first-year students could benefit from taking an exam which correlates adverse childhood experiences with a likelihood for addiction later in life.

The Wellness Council of Indiana this week launched a series of events to help employers address substance abuse and recovery issues in their workforce.

How Indiana's Addiction Crisis Impacts Families

Nov 20, 2018
Dr. Joseph Ryan presents at the meeting to highlight the opioid epidemic on families. (Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
Jill Sheridan

Indiana has one of highest rates of children in foster care and much of the blame is placed on neglect related to substance use. The Center for Families at Purdue University hosted a meeting to frame what is working in other states and highlight policies.

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Shutterstock

Starting December 1, patients on Indiana’s Healthy Indiana Plan will have an easier time getting certain opioid addiction medications. The four insurers that manage plans for Indiana’s Medicaid program, HIP 2.0, are eliminating an administrative hurdle that can cause patients to wait days to receive their prescription, leaving them vulnerable to relapse and overdose.

Gretchen Frazee / IPBS

After months of struggling to secure a location, the Tippecanoe County Health Department plans to inaugurate a needle exchange program in its building this Friday. 

The program comes nearly a year after a public health emergency was issued for the county.

Legislation Aims To Increase Addiction Providers

Jun 29, 2017

More than half of Indiana counties don’t have mental health care options available. A new bipartisan proposal in Congress to increase the number of providers specializing in addiction treatment.

U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) says many Hoosiers, just like many in America, are battling addiction to opioids and other dangerous substances. And he says there’s s a need for more professionals on the front lines.

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Esther Honig / Side Effects/WOSU

Charlie Stewart is tall, 25 years old, and broad-shouldered. He’s wearing a gray polo shirt and slacks, and starts each morning with a protein shake.

Every Tuesday you can find him walking the narrow linoleum halls of the emergency department at Mount Carmel West in Columbus, Ohio.

deepfruit / https://www.flickr.com/photos/slippek/

Indiana senators are looking to add more restrictions and regulations to county syringe exchange programs, or SEPs.

Four amendments have been added a bill granting counties the ability to set up their own syringe services programs. Currently, the state health commissioner must certify a public health emergency before such a program can be created.

Nathan Forget / flickr.com/photos/nathanf/

A bill that would give counties the ability to set up needle exchanges without first getting state approval is one step closer to becoming law.

A Senate committee has approved the bill despite concerns from Attorney General Curtis Hill.

The Attorney General’s office says it’s neutral on the legislation, but nevertheless sent a representative to Wednesday’s Health and Provider Services Committee with a list of amendments.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

In his state of the city address this week, Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski touted reductions in many different categories of crime.

But publicly available data created by the Lafayette Police Department doesn’t seem to jibe with the mayor’s announced statistics.

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we ask him to explain how his numbers are so different from the ones the public can see.


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