Affordable Care Act

A new study is the first to measure access to preventative health care services after the Affordable Care Act, or ACA.

The study looked at low-income adults without children in 30 states, including Indiana, where Medicaid has been expanded. It finds these adults are accessing more preventative care services like immunizations, screenings and mammograms.

Indiana University researcher and professor Kosali Simon co-authored the paper and says prevention is one goal of the ACA.

Indiana’s new governor, Eric Holcomb, vowed to tackle the state’s drug addiction epidemic in his first State of the State address on Tuesday. But he has also said he supports Congress’s plans to repeal and replace Obamacare.

Jim Nix / https://www.flickr.com/photos/jimnix/6168273244

Approximately 1,000 Hoosiers showed up in Indianapolis Sunday to protest congressional efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act. The rally was organized by a coalition of local and state-wide organizations, including Planned Parenthood, the Indiana Democratic Party and the state chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America.

Rallies across the U.S. were spurred in part by Senator Bernie Sanders (who was not in attendance at the Indianapolis event).

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Even though many Hoosiers will be facing increased prices and fewer options on the Affordable Care Act’s federal health insurance exchange next year, Indiana’s enrollment for 2017 is still up by more than 9 thousand people.

According to figures released Wednesday by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, more than 119 thousand Hoosiers have signed up for insurance on healthcare.gov for coverage beginning January 1, a nearly 9 percent increase.

https://www.healthcare.gov/

Open enrollment on the Affordable Care Act exchange begins Nov. 1. But how much Hoosiers will pay on the ACA marketplace depends on many factors — including whom is asked. 

Last week the Obama administration announced new rates on the federal marketplace will rise an average of 22 percent nationwide. That reported increase, though, is only based on one benchmark Silver plan, which is used to calculate federal subsidies.

Alex E. Proimos / https://www.flickr.com/photos/proimos/

Indiana University Health Plans, which provides insurance to approximately 23,000 Hoosiers, is the latest company to announce it won’t be offering coverage through the Affordable Care Act exchange in 2017.

Earlier this year, United Healthcare announced it was exiting Indiana’s individual marketplace, and last month, Fort Wayne-based Physicians Health Plan of Northern Indiana followed suit.

Thomas Hawk / https://www.flickr.com/photos/thomashawk/

Four out of the six insurance companies planning to offer coverage to Hoosiers through the federal healthcare exchange next year are proposing double-digit rate increases for individual premiums, according to proposals filed with the Indiana Department of Insurance.

However, the proposals vary widely. For example, Celtic is proposing a 5 percent drop in prices, and Anthem wants an almost-30 percent increase.

UW Health / https://www.flickr.com/photos/uwhealth/

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is funneling over $7 million in federal money to Indiana healthcare centers to help revamp their facilities.

The grant is funded through the Affordable Care Act’s Community Health Center Fund. The Indiana health centers receiving grant money are in Gary, Jeffersonville, Indianapolis, Portage, West Lafayette, Merrillville and Clinton.

Indiana’s Raphael Health Center CEO Dee Roudebush says they’ve been awarded $1 million.

The two Republicans seeking their party's nomination to run for Indiana's open U.S. Senate seat are placing plans to replace the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, at the center of their campaigns.

Indiana Public Broadcasting's Brandon Smith reports the candidates agree more often than not, but some aspects of their proposals are met with skepticism from public healthcare experts.

Phil Roeder / https://www.flickr.com/photos/tabor-roeder/

Leaders from Indiana’s medical device industry and both of the state’s U.S. Senators hailed Congress’ passage Friday of a more than trillion-dollar spending bill, a measure that temporarily halts a controversial medical device tax.

Senators Joe Donnelly and Dan Coats have long criticized the medical device tax created by the Affordable Care Act, calling for its repeal.  The omnibus spending measure approved by Congress suspends the tax for two years. 

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