Affordable Care Act

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The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is funneling over $7 million in federal money to Indiana healthcare centers to help revamp their facilities.

The grant is funded through the Affordable Care Act’s Community Health Center Fund. The Indiana health centers receiving grant money are in Gary, Jeffersonville, Indianapolis, Portage, West Lafayette, Merrillville and Clinton.

Indiana’s Raphael Health Center CEO Dee Roudebush says they’ve been awarded $1 million.

The two Republicans seeking their party's nomination to run for Indiana's open U.S. Senate seat are placing plans to replace the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, at the center of their campaigns.

Indiana Public Broadcasting's Brandon Smith reports the candidates agree more often than not, but some aspects of their proposals are met with skepticism from public healthcare experts.

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Leaders from Indiana’s medical device industry and both of the state’s U.S. Senators hailed Congress’ passage Friday of a more than trillion-dollar spending bill, a measure that temporarily halts a controversial medical device tax.

Senators Joe Donnelly and Dan Coats have long criticized the medical device tax created by the Affordable Care Act, calling for its repeal.  The omnibus spending measure approved by Congress suspends the tax for two years. 

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An Indiana University health policy expert says insurance companies might deal a big blow to Obamacare.

Last week, UnitedHealth Group, the nation's largest health insurer, said it might withdraw from the Affordable Care Act's health exchanges after next year if it was unable to turn around what it calls huge financial losses.

While state and federal exchanges only make up a small percentage of the company's business, United says it will lose $700-million on them this year and next.

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The House has again voted to repeal the medical device tax included in the federal health care law -- but Indiana manufacturers insist this time, it might stick.

The Senate is considering repeal of the 2.3-percent tax under a rule which prohibits a filibuster. That makes the bill likely to reach President Obama's desk for the first time.

The White House has already threatened a veto, but Indiana Medical Device Manufacturers Council president Denis Johnson maintains there's reason to believe Obama might reconsider.

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The Montgomery County Health Department is trying to build an area-wide health assessment through public survey.

The study asks residents and those who use the county’s services to answer questions about their personal health needs. Public Health Accreditation Coordinator Luke Wren says the anonymous responses will be built into a health improvement plan.

Wren says he’s hoping to get responses faster this year than during an earlier survey.

Brandon Smith / Indiana Public Broadcasting

The U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling upholding the Affordable Care Act's tax subsidies was a major victory for the Obama administration. The healthcare law is now two-for-two surviving challenges before he nation’s highest court. Butother lawsuits that could gut the bill still loom -- including a challenge out of Indiana.  

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Tens of thousands of Hoosiers can breathe a sigh of relief – the U.S. Supreme Court Thursday ruled they’ll get to keep their federal health insurance subsidies.  

About 160, 000 Hoosiers receive tax subsidies through the federal health care exchange, reducing the cost of their insurance by an average of $320 a month.  The Supreme Court’s ruling ensures they’ll continue to receive those subsidies, something Covering Kids and Families of Indiana spokesperson Caitlin Priest says is a huge relief to the families her organization serves.

IU Expert Says ACA Ruling Is A Win For Indiana

Jun 25, 2015
UW Health / https://www.flickr.com/photos/uwhealth/

The health insurance market in Indiana will remain unchanged after the Supreme Court’s ruling to uphold federal subsidies under the Affordable Care Act.

The 6-to-3 ruling in the King v. Burwell case leaves in place the federal subsidies provided to taxpayers who buy health insurance through the federal healthcare exchange.

Those challenging the law argued the subsidies were designed to go only to those who buy insurance through state-run exchanges.

Indiana Republicans opposed the passage and implementation of the Affordable Care Act, including their refusal to create a state-run insurance marketplace.  Now, an impending Supreme Court decision could leave thousands of Hoosiers without subsidies to help pay for that health care.  And partisan differences are once again shaping the debate on how to respond if the state loses those subsidies.

When IU School of Social Work Professor Heather McCabe found out Indiana would not create a state-run exchange under the Affordable Care Act, she was surprised.

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