agriculture

This spring's wet weather and flooding challenged Indiana farmers trying to plant their crops with enough time for them to fully grow. Many delayed planting, some grew no crops at all. 

File Photo: WFIU/WTIU News

A Cloverdale company is blaming the Trump administration for stopping its production of biofuels.

POET officials say in a press release EPA waivers have cut biofuels demand by 4 billion gallons and reduced the demand for corn by 1.4 billion bushels.

Indiana Farm Bureau’s Director of National Government Relations, Bob White, says local farmers will likely have to find a new market for their crops if production doesn’t return.

Farmers' Economic Optimism Drops In Latest Survey

May 14, 2019

Farmers' confidence in the economy tumbled last month, according to the latest Ag Economy Barometer reading. The April survey had the fourth largest sentiment index drop since it began in 2015.

Indiana and the rest of the world are going to have to make transformative changes — and fast — to avoid losing more than 1 million species of plants and animals. That’s the takeaway from the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) report released this week. 

Panel Discusses The Growing Role Of Women In Agriculture

Jan 28, 2019
(Left to Right) Indiana farmers Leah Beyer, Susan Brocksmith, Joyce Kron and Kelly Whiteman Snipes discuss life as a women in the ag industry during a panel session at the Indiana Young Farmer and Ag Professionals Conference. (Samantha Horton/IPB News)
Samantha Horton

A panel of female farmers at the Indiana Young Farmer and Ag Professionals Conference Saturday addressed hurdles and opportunities women in the industry face in the years to come.

(From left to right) Reynolds Farm Equipment CEO Mitch Frazier talks with panelists AgNext CEO Troy Fiechter, farmer Jim Kline, and Taranis head of marketing Alex Whitley during Forbes AgTech Summit in Indianapolis. (Samantha Horton/IPB News)
Samantha Horton

Indiana farmers say high-tech agriculture has helped them be more profitable, but it also poses challenges. Some farms say it’s become difficult to find skilled employees who can use modern equipment.

John Clare

John Clare talks to Executive Director Leslie Martin Conwell, and Education/Event Coordinator Lauren Reed of the Farm at Prophetstown, a 1920’s farmstead highlighting sustainable agriculture, homesteading, heirloom gardening, and farm to table cooking. Activities go throughout the year, and Conwell and Reed discuss the most popular events, plus ways to volunteer.

New research from Purdue University finds that climate change could have far more adverse impacts on agriculture than originally thought.

The study provides a new “social cost of carbon.” State and federal agencies often use the metric to determine the damage additional carbon dioxide released to the atmosphere will have on society and the economy.

Indiana’s corn harvest is still 10 percent behind schedule as of this week, with soybeans about on track as a year of difficult farming conditions stretches into November.

The unpredictability of this year’s weather may be an unwelcome new normal for Hoosier agriculture, according to Purdue University agronomist Bob Nielsen.

In 2017, Indiana has seen a wet spring and long planting season, an over-warm start to fall and now, rains that are lengthening the multi-billion-dollar grain harvest. Nielsen says data shows extremes like those are becoming increasingly standard.

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue stressed the importance of agricultural education and the need for more young people to get involved in agriculture policy.

“These young people are the ones I will exhort and implore to communicate and be aggressive advocates for truth,” he said.

FFA member Tess Seibel, from Virginia, agreed with Perdue. She says misconceptions around the food production process is one of the biggest challenges facing farmers today.

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