bicycle and pedestrian safety

City of West Lafayette

The city of West Lafayette has spent significant time in recent months pondering new rules for different types of transportation. First it was electric scooters. This month on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we discuss the push to regulate the pedal-powered beer wagons that could soon be navigating the city’s streets and the addition of a term to city law that strikes fear in the hearts of cyclists: dooring.

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More than a dozen Tippecanoe County streets would get state funding for improvements under a plan preliminarily approved by the county’s Technical Transportation Committee this week.

County officials will open the plan to public comment this spring, before submitting it to state officials. It includes numerous road and sidewalk improvements to be carried out during the next five years.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Credit Crawfordsville residents for trying to improve safety in a number of ways – even if there may be pushback.

In the wake of recent mass shootings, the city’s police department will oversee a church gun buyback event this weekend. But is the city prepared for possible protests?

The reconstituted human rights commission has begun to meet, but what issues are they addressing first?

And, like Lafayette, the city has established a bicycle and pedestrian committee to focus on the safety of those not in cars.  But how to balance who rules the road?

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

If there’s one thing we here at WBAA want you to know about Ask The Mayor, it’s this: when you have a question, ask it!

On this week’s conversation with Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski, one of our youngest question-askers ever – just 12 years old – engages the mayor on a public policy question that the cities of Lafayette and West Lafayette have decided differently.

courtesy Tippecanoe County Area Plan Commission

Tippecanoe County leaders will get a look Thursday at one of the first data-driven attempts at measuring cycling and walking in the community.

The Area Plan Commission will see a map showing more than 40 sites where volunteers have measured the volume of bikes and pedestrians.

APC Assistant Director for Transportation Planning John Thomas says it’s just a first step – more sites will still be surveyed – but it’s a way to keep lawmakers skeptical of building more bike-ped infrastructure engaged in the discussion.

cycleluxembourg / https://www.flickr.com/photos/cycleluxembourg/

The Lafayette City Council Tuesday night is expected to conduct a second reading of an ordinance creating an advisory committee which would be charged with making the city’s streets safer for bicyclists and pedestrians.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

The City of Lafayette has begun evicting some residents from low-income housing just south of the city’s downtown.

That’s because those homes are slated to be razed and replaced with new townhomes.

It’s all part of Mayor Tony Roswarski’s strategy to increase population density near downtown – an area that still doesn’t have a grocery store.

But could such a move be made to help the city’s dilapidated north end, which is home to run-down houses and Lafayette’s highest crime rate?

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Nearly two years after a distracted driver hit and injured a cyclist on Harrison Bridge between Lafayette and West Lafayette, an ad hoc committee is finally close to realizing its goal of launching a bike safety campaign.

Lafayette Community Development Project Manager Margy Deverall says public comments collected from an online survey now underway will help shape the informational campaign to make drivers, cyclists and pedestrians more aware of each other.

Chris Morisse Vizza

Access to Lafayette’s Columbian Park at South Street will significantly change next year in an effort to make the three-way intersection with Park Avenue and Scott Street safer for pedestrians, cyclists and drivers.

Assistant city engineer Bob Foley says Scott Street will be closed permanently at South Street, eliminating the awkward angled junction with South just a few feet west of Park Avenue.

“It creates confusion with two roads intercepting at such a diagonal in such proximity to each other,” he says.

Rob Ketcherside / https://www.flickr.com/photos/tigerzombie/3874088349

A report from the Governor’s State Highway Association estimating the nation will see a 10 percent increase in pedestrian fatalities between 2014 and 2015 made waves earlier this month.

Data from the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute indicates the state saw nearly twice that increase in the same time period.

Richard Retting, who works for Sam Swartz Consulting and served as the lead author of the GSHA fatality report, says one would need to go back nearly 20 years to see similar fatality numbers.

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