Byron Ernest

The accountability system for Indiana's public schools could change. Yet whether that means added flexibility to the controversial A-F format or blowing up the system entirely remains to be seen.

Dr. Byron Ernest is the secretary of the Indiana State Board of Education. (Eric Weddle/WFYI News)
Jeanie Lindsay

Changes to education in Indiana are coming over the next two years with new standardized tests and federal education law, but members of the State Board of Education plan to postpone another shift around school accountability.

Discussion continues on how to overhaul high school graduation requirements to better prepare students for workforce and college.

A 2017 state law calls for rethinking different ways students can prove they are ready to graduate instead of the traditional end-of-course exams required to earn a diploma.

Richard Lee / https://www.flickr.com/photos/70109407@N00/

 

Last week, state superintendent Glenda Ritz and State Board of Education member Byron Ernest went to D.C. for separate national conferences to learn what the new education law, the Every Student Succeeds Act (the re-write of No Child Left Behind) could meant here at home.

The national conferences align with ongoing federal negotiations that aim to translate ESSA’s broader mandates to the more specific changes that will be applied in each state.

New Members Named To State Board of Education

May 27, 2015
NYC Department of Education / http://schools.nyc.gov/default.htm

The leaders of the State House and Senate have made their initial appointments to the revamped State Board of Education. Byron Ernest was appointed to the board by House Speaker Brian Bosma (R-Indianapolis). That announcement came less than three hours after Senate President David Long (R-Fort Wayne) announced his appointee, Steve Yager.