China

The U.S.-China trade war continues with President Donald Trump threatening to place 25 percent tariffs on more Chinese imports. However, businesses and economist warn consumers will be the ones paying.

'Milkman Model' Economy Could Create Jobs In Indiana

Jun 12, 2019

This year’s Indiana Recycling Coalition Conference focused less on recycling and more on the other two R’s — reduce and reuse. China’s refusal to take the United States’ low-grade recycling is forcing some communities to think about a more holistic approach. 

In a recent survey, most Indiana farmers say the Trump administration's trade policy is putting their operations in “jeopardy.”

Indiana businesses are concerned the escalated trade war between the United States and China will hurt their financial future.

Farmers' Economic Optimism Drops In Latest Survey

May 14, 2019

Farmers' confidence in the economy tumbled last month, according to the latest Ag Economy Barometer reading. The April survey had the fourth largest sentiment index drop since it began in 2015.

(wuestenigel/Flickr)
Samantha Horton

Retailers say that they can’t absorb the extra costs from the Trump administration’s increased tariffs on billions of dollars in Chinese imports. Now consumers can expect to see price increases when shopping.

President Donald Trump boosted tariffs Friday on Chinese imports from 10 to 25 percent. As trade talks continue, U.S. businesses warn the increase will hurt them and consumers.

Purdue University President Mitch Daniels talk with U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue on a variety of issues impacting the agricultural industry. (Samantha Horton/IPB News)
Samantha Horton

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue fielded several trade questions while visiting Purdue University Tuesday morning including numerous inquiries about the potential economic impacts of the southern border crisis.

The Trump administration’s third round of tariffs to be imposed on China includes handbags, a product made by northeast Indiana-based Vera Bradley.

(Wikimedia Commons)
Lauren Chapman

Thursday night at the stroke of midnight, speculations became reality when the U.S.-imposed tariffs on $34 billion worth of Chinese goods.

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