Chris Hurt

The U.S. Department of Agriculture released updated numbers Monday showing farmers planted more acres this spring than many private analysts expected. That’s one of several factors driving market prices lower for many farmers’ crops.

Indiana farmers can expect to make more money next year, but not as much money as they were making just a few years ago. One Purdue University economist forecasts farm income for 2019.

Indiana farmers anticipate high yields for corn and soybeans. But coupled with retaliatory tariffs against the U.S. from China, Canada and Mexico, farmers’ income could continue to be depressed.

Indiana is set to have unexpectedly big corn and soybean harvests this fall. That means continued tight profit margins for farmers and more low food prices for consumers.

Purdue University agronomists made their annual announcement of the state’s crop production forecast at the State Fair Thursday.

They say yields should better than expected, after weeks of wet, patchy weather. But economist Chris Hurt says that extra supply for the same demand will mean bad prices for Hoosier farmers.

National Agriculture Census Signup Deadline A Week Away

Jun 22, 2017
Peter M. Graham / flickr.com/photos/pmgrah/106202984

To be counted in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Ag Census, first-time participants have to sign up by June 30. This year, small farms are receiving extra attention.

Farmers who earn more than $1,000 in revenue a year are required to complete the census, which takes place every five years. First-timers have to sign up by the end of this month to be counted.

Consolidated Grain & Barge

A major soybean distributor will spend more than $30 million to expand its operations on the Ohio River.

Consolidated Grain & Barge, or CGB, is aiming to capitalize on growing export markets in countries like China by expanding its plant at the Port of Indiana-Mt. Vernon in Posey County.

The expansion will more than double CGB's soybean processing capacity there, with a new daily output that will fill 130 semi-trucks, or around three river barges.

accozzaglia dot ca / https://www.flickr.com/photos/aged_accozzaglia/2705768470

 

Harvest season is beginning for corn and soybeans in Indiana.

The latest USDA numbers say 74 percent of Indiana corn is mature, and 15 percent has been harvested. That's a little better than average. Soybeans are slightly behind, with 9 percent harvested as of this week.

Cause For 'Concern' As Corn Planting Slows

May 9, 2016
slowdevil / https://www.flickr.com/photos/slowdevil/3678747832/

Hoosier farmers didn't make much progress planting corn in the past week, after a strong early start -- and they're running out of time to get the state's signature crop in the ground.

Heavy spring rainfall didn't stop Indiana farmers from planting twice as much corn by the start of May as they had in 2015. They were on their way to planting a projected 2.6 percent more acres of corn than last year, despite a glut of the crop worldwide.

Hog Buyers See A Big Market For Small Pigs

Apr 13, 2016
Annie Ropeik/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Indiana has the fifth largest pig farming industry in the country, turning out 8.5 million hogs a year. But some are too small for the huge slaughterhouses that require pigs to be a certain size and condition for speedy processing.

Now, Indiana's industry to broker these smaller pigs is growing.

Nebraska-based Wiechman Pig Company opened a new facility in Delphi in late March. Inside, a big, friendly sow greets manager Jeff Petree. She's one of a couple dozen pigs he bought from Indiana farmers in his opening week.

David Cornwell/https://www.flickr.com/photos/dave_cornwell/3818629571

The USDA is estimating that American farmers may plant more corn this summer than they have in years.

 

But with the news that China will begin selling off its huge corn stockpiles, economists say prices could suffer.

Indiana accounts for 2.6 percent of the national increase. Purdue University agricultural economist Chris Hurt says the state increase came from fields that went unplanted last summer due to floods.

Pages