City of Frankfort

Taylor Haggerty / WBAA News

Frankfort officials have suspended the city’s curbside recycling pickup this week after a Monday fire at a recycling plant, but officials say residents can still drop off materials at the city street department.

Street Superintendent Jason Forsythe says the city began partnering with Werner and Son for its recycling a few years ago, when the amount of materials to be processed became too much for its own facilities.

Taylor Haggerty / WBAA News

A fire at a Frankfort recycling plant continued to burn Monday afternoon as firefighters fought back the blaze.

Teams were dispatched to Werner and Son Recycling around 4:30 Monday morning after a passerby reported what they thought was a dumpster fire. Officials don’t know what caused the blaze, which tore down much of the east side of the building and left only the façade on the west.

Investigators still don’t know the cause of a fire that engulfed two buildings, and threatened a third, on Frankfort’s courthouse square Tuesday morning.

“I don’t think they come any more serious than this,” says Frankfort Mayor Chris McBarnes.

courtesy City of Frankfort

Frankfort Mayor Chris McBarnes, who’d previously been vehement about his desire not to serve more than two terms in office, now says he’ll stand for re-election next year.

McBarnes was one of Indiana’s youngest mayors when he was first elected in 2011, shortly after he graduated college. For almost the entirety of his seven years in office, he’s said two terms was his limit.

But McBarnes held an official campaign kickoff Thursday night, and says as he looked at future career options, he felt out of place leaving government.

City of Frankfort

After the Gem City dealt with the first real freeze of the season, Frankfort Mayor Chris McBarnes talks street preparedness when the storms hit. And with Thanksgiving coming up, the city is hoping to finish some repair projects before the holiday rush.

On WBAA's Ask the Mayor, McBarnes also discusses the city's rich history when it comes to the U.S. military, and how Frankfort recently honored veterans across the community. And aside from the holidays, how Frankfort serves those who served.

Jimmy Emerson / https://www.flickr.com/photos/auvet/14984748055

The kerfuffle concerning the Clinton County Humane Society and its finances has led at least one additional person to run for office.

J.J. Tate, son of fired Humane Society Director Jim Tate, plans to seek an at-large city council seat in next year’s municipal elections.

The younger Tate, who’s 28 years old, says attending public meetings after his father was pink-slipped caused him to believe the city needs new blood in office.

“You know, there’s a lot of things that are going on in the city that I really feel people aren’t just clued into,” Tate says.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

Clinton County Humane Society board members submitted documentation Monday night to show just how they’ve spent City of Frankfort funds on a trap, neuter, release program.

Mayor Chris McBarnes says while he was happy a subdued city council meeting was “civil and well-run,” he believes gaps remain in the information provided.

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

Board member resignations. Viral rumors on social media. Tax-paying citizens turning out en masse to demand answers. At the center of it all? The Clinton County Humane Society. What started out as a personnel dispute may turn out to be a harbinger of much larger financial problems in the county.

Highway-Rail Crossing Matching Grant Deadline A Week Away

Aug 24, 2018
Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

Indiana localities have only a week left to apply for the state’s matching grant program designed to separate roadways from railroad tracks.

To receive part of the Local Trax grant, local governments have to pitch a safety enhancement project for a highway-rail intersection. The applications are scored based on factors including how many cars and trains cross per day. If a project is chosen, the state will cover 80-percent of its cost.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

For Indiana cities, having a good relationship with railroad companies can help generate a lot of business. But trains can also clog cities, making drivers wait at blocked road crossings. Mayors have begun to fight freight railroads, who they say have too much power and not enough accountability.

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