Clean Air Act

Electric city buses and school buses are just some of vehicles the state will help buy with money from the Volkswagen settlement. Indiana received more than $40 million to reduce the state’s diesel emissions after the company violated the Clean Air Act. 

The state is less than a week away from submitting its plan on what to do with $40 million from the Volkswagen emissions settlement. The money will go to help offset the damage done by the company’s violation of the Clean Air Act.

The state's revised plan for what to do with money from a Volkswagen settlement takes public feedback into account.

Indiana received more than $40 million after the company violated the Clean Air Act. Several people wanted to use the money for greener school buses and electric charging stations — and the new draft covers those bases. 

Dave Emerson / https://www.flickr.com/photos/daveemerson/

Indiana saw the third-largest decrease in coal use, nationally since 2007, a change the federal Energy Information Administration credits the reduction in coal use to the affordability of cleaner alternatives.

Indiana used 37 percent less coal for electricity generation between 2007 and 2015. Only Ohio and Pennsylvania saw a larger decrease.

Beyond Coal campaign representative for the Sierra Club Jodi Perras says she interprets the Energy Information Agency, or EIA, report to mean Indiana’s coal industry is on its way out.

Alan Berning / https://www.flickr.com/photos/14617207@N00/2621375759

Indiana is once again headed to federal court to block and Environmental Protection Agency regulation. 

Indiana was part of an effort to block the EPA's power plant rule before it became final. The latest lawsuit -- involving Indiana and 23 other states -- takes aim at the regulation now that it's taken effect. 

The EPA rule would require Hoosier state power plants to reduce their carbon emissions between 30 and 38 percent by 2030....a mandate Gov. Mike Pence calls ill-conceived, saying it will be too costly for the state to comply,