combined sewer overflow

Almost every Lake Michigan beach that was tested in Indiana last year had at least one day where high bacteria levels could have threatened swimmers’ health. That’s according to a national report on beach water quality by Environment America. 

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

As construction crews near the halfway point of Lafayette’s Combined Sewer Overflow project, they’re finishing off some big elements. Friday, the city opened a giant water tank, about the size of an NFL football field, for media tours before it’s sealed off.

To enter the tank on Friday morning, visitors including State Rep. Sheila Klinker and Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski had to walk through a darkened pipe, nine feet in diameter.

“Can you imagine when the water’s flowing through here?” Roswarski says.

“Listen to that echo. Woo!” Klinker says.

Peter Organisciak / https://www.flickr.com/photos/organisciak/525843127

At least one Indiana water company is warning its customers to be mindful of the chemicals they put on their lawns.

Indiana American Water issued a press release saying recent heavy rains have made it more likely that pesticides and other chemicals would flow from urban lawns into municipal sewer systems.

Once they get there, Office of the Indiana State Chemist pesticide administrator David Scott says they can be hard to treat – especially if the chemicals dissolve during heavy rains like Indiana has seen in recent weeks.

City of West Lafayette

Tippecanoe County wants to establish a new major bridge tax to cover the costs of replacing large bridges 20 to 50 years from now.  But, creating the tax would subtract some revenue from the city of West Lafayette.  Mayor John Dennis weighs in on the costs versus benefits of paying to maintain county bridges.

Daniel X. O'Neil / https://www.flickr.com/photos/juggernautco/

More than 100 Indiana sewage systems, including those in Lafayette and West Lafayette, are undergoing millions of dollars in upgrades to comply with U.S. EPA regulations that restrict the overflow during heavy rains of untreated wastewater into rivers and streams.

City of West Lafayette / http://westlafayette.in.gov/

The State Street redesign is one of the most ambitious – and costly – projects the city of West Lafayette has ever attempted.

But is its expected $60-80 million price tag an albatross around the city’s neck that prevents leaders from improving water infrastructure at a time some west side residents are complaining they’re poorly served?

John Dennis faces that question and more this week on Ask The Mayor.

Also coming up in this half hour: Speaking of projects that have hung around too long, a listener wants to know when she can get back into Happy Hollow Park.