Covering Kids and Families of Indiana

Hoosiers who receive health insurance through the Healthy Indiana Plan, or HIP, may have to start logging work hours. 

Educators Learn Advocacy At School Health Conference

Jul 1, 2019

Mental health and Medicaid were some of the policy topics presented at the annual School Health Conference in Indianapolis this week but therewas also push for more action.

Last year the federal government rolled back rules that restricted short-term health insurance plans. These plans do not have to comply with protections under the Affordable Care Act, including pre-existing conditions.

School health text book. (Jill Sheridan IPB News)
Jill Sheridan

Topics at the annual Indiana School Health Conference this week touch on numerous supportive health services and the issue of school safety was front and center. 

More Indiana schools are focused on how to best provide social and emotional learning in an effort to support students behavioral health. 

It’s the last week for open enrollment on the Affordable Care Act’s health insurance marketplace as the window closes Dec. 15. Health insurance experts say it’s business as usual despite a number of changes that have caused some confusion this year.

A shortened enrollment period is the most obvious difference for people signing up on the Marketplace this year. Reduced promotion and federal fighting over repeal of the law has added to uncertainty says Care Source Indiana’s Steve Smitherman.

CHIP Expires: What That Means For Hoosier Children

Oct 2, 2017

Congress let funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) expire over the weekend. The program that provides health insurance for nearly 100,000 Hoosier children has reserves to continue normal operations for now.

Jointly funded by the federal government and the states, CHIP has covered Hoosier children for 20 years.

The Affordable Care Act increased funding and brought the state’s expenses down. Covering Kids and Families public policy director Mark Fairchild says Indiana has rollover money that will help cover as federal funding goes away.

Hoosier Children's Health Lags Behind In Kids Count

Jun 13, 2017

Children in Indiana are falling behind in a number of health measures according to the latest data from the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

The 2017 Kids Count Data Book looks at children’s well-being in four areas: family, economics, education and health. In the health category, Indiana fell to 35th in the nation, down four spots.

There was a significant increase in the number of teen and children deaths and an eleven percent increase in the number of homicides and suicides. Indiana Youth Institute President Tammi Silverman says some of those deaths are preventable.

When the Republican healthcare plan was passed by the U.S. House of Representatives last week, an amendment that could impact people with pre-existing conditions drew strong reactions. Advocacy groups for domestic violence survivors were among the first to speak up.

Training services manager with the Domestic Violence Network, Mary Margret Sweeny says she is concerned about some of the language in the American Health Care Act.

UW Health / https://www.flickr.com/photos/uwhealth/

Indiana’s Medicaid expansion, HIP 2.0, has wrapped up its first year. The state estimates about 60 percent of all eligible Hoosiers have enrolled in some form of the plan, which aims to instill personal responsibility in low-income residents with a payment model based on commercial insurance standards.

Hoosier Teens Lag In Medicaid Coverage

May 26, 2016
Christiana Care / https://www.flickr.com/photos/christianacare/

Indiana adolescents participate in Medicaid and children’s health programs at a significantly lower rate than their younger counterparts, according to data from the Urban Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Of 13-to-18 year olds in Indiana who can receive Medicaid coverage, 83 percent are actually enrolled. That’s compared with 89 and 88 percent of kids 0-5 and 6-12, respectively. That 5 percent gap is standard across the U.S., although the national participation rates are higher on average.

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