Crawfordsville

Taylor Haggerty / WBAA News

Crawfordsville is making an effort to improve walkability and safety around town, starting with its schools. The city is updating school zone speed limits and locations for the first time in 35 years.

A lack of child care has become an issue in many Indiana cities – not just because parents have to take days off to watch their kids, but also because that loss of worker productivity hurts municipalities hoping to grow. In Crawfordsville, officials hope to mitigate the issue by encouraging a series of unlicensed providers to boost the capacity of their in-home operations.

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, spring has sprung. Farmers markets are preparing to open for the season in just a few weeks, and that includes in Crawfordsville, where the market will move to the city’s new Pike Place Park. Is the new venue ready for new events?

This week in our talk with Crawfordsville Mayor Todd Barton, we’ll discuss the final draft of the Montgomery County Comprehensive Plan, and where Crawfordsville fits in. How does the city align with the county’s goals—and where does it differ?  

WBAA

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

The City of Crawfordsville, like many smaller Indiana municipalities, struggles to provide a comprehensive set of medical services. But anticipated investment in an autism treatment center for kids could help to lessen the number of families who have to seek treatment elsewhere.

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we chat with Crawfordsville Mayor Todd Barton about how much his push to recruit young professionals is impacted by becoming a one-stop shop for amenities people expect in the 21st Century – and whether such a thing is even possible in a town of 16,000 people.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

In the 21st Century, it’s a bit of an open question how small-to-midsized Indiana cities will attract industry or grow their population base.

Gone are the days of a railroad or a new university creating a boomtown, so what’s a place like Crawfordsville to do?

The answer is probably not going to be “build a windfarm,” so perhaps instead of trying to grow the permanent populace, the city can try to attract visitors on more weekends.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Crawfordsville Mayor Todd Barton has seen previous attempts at regional cooperation fail to serve his community well – especially when Tippecanoe County officials were in the lead.

So forgive him for not being effusive with praise when the Lilly Endowment gave nearly $40 million to the so-called Wabash Heartland Innovation Network, or WHIN, a group of 10 West Central Indiana counties.

Crawfordsville Wraps Up 2018 Budget Workshops

Jul 25, 2017
https://www.flickr.com/photos/jstephenconn/3051019997
J. Stephen Conn

The city of Crawfordsville completed its final budget workshop Monday night, and despite a 10-percent health insurance premium increase, the mayor says it could have been much worse.

During the meeting, Crawfordsville mayor Todd Barton said at the county level, premiums are going up 20-percent. The city’s employees are also receiving a two-percent salary increase.

The majority of the city’s departments have little to no significant change in their budget for next year, which Barton says is due to planning.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jstephenconn/3051019997
J. Stephen Conn

The newly-reformed Crawfordsville Commission on Human Rights is looking to tackle what the city says is a growing number of issues concerning diversity in the Montgomery County community.

The 12-person commission is intended to serve as an advising body to the mayor and city council on affairs concerning diversity and human rights in the community. The commission was officially created in 1979 but involvement had lapsed in recent years.

Indiana Economic Development Corporation / http://indianaregionalcities.com/

State leaders have pinned Indiana’s economic fortunes to regional economic development initiatives.  

Many programs have been created in the last few years to foster cooperation between nearby counties and cities.

But as WBAA’s Chris Morisse Vizza reports, at least two West Central Indiana mayors say the inherent instinct to compete for jobs and corporate investment is an obstacle.

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