crop yields

Courtesy of Purdue University Center for Commercial Agriculture

A recent measure of agricultural sentiment showed farmers increasingly worried about their economic futures. 

The Ag Economy Barometer saw the largest single-month drop since it was created in 2016. Barometer principal investigator Jim Mintert says farmers are worried about low commodity prices and continuing tariffs. 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture released updated numbers Monday showing farmers planted more acres this spring than many private analysts expected. That’s one of several factors driving market prices lower for many farmers’ crops.

Indiana farmers anticipate high yields for corn and soybeans. But coupled with retaliatory tariffs against the U.S. from China, Canada and Mexico, farmers’ income could continue to be depressed.

New research from Purdue University finds that climate change could have far more adverse impacts on agriculture than originally thought.

The study provides a new “social cost of carbon.” State and federal agencies often use the metric to determine the damage additional carbon dioxide released to the atmosphere will have on society and the economy.

Indiana is partway into a record-setting cash crop harvest – but months of uneven weather conditions have put some farmers behind.

The state’s soybean crop is 42 percent harvested as of this week, about the same as average. But the corn crop lags at just 24 percent.

Purdue University agronomist Bob Nielsen says wet weather earlier this year forced some farmers to plant late or replant their crops, and cool August temperatures lengthened the growing season.

Indiana’s corn and soybean industries are pushing back against a New York Times investigation that alleges genetically modified crops, or GMOs, haven’t done what they set out to do.

Companies like Monsanto made GMOs a mainstay in agriculture 20 years ago, by altering corn and soybeans to kill pests and withstand chemical use.

Valerie Everett / https://www.flickr.com/photos/valeriebb/273444106

 

Indiana farmers aren't harvesting quite as much corn as expected this year — but they should still have record yields for soybeans.

As of this month, the USDA is expecting Indiana soybean yields of 59 bushels per acre. It's even better than their initial forecast, and it beats 2014's state record.

accozzaglia dot ca / https://www.flickr.com/photos/aged_accozzaglia/2705768470

 

Harvest season is beginning for corn and soybeans in Indiana.

The latest USDA numbers say 74 percent of Indiana corn is mature, and 15 percent has been harvested. That's a little better than average. Soybeans are slightly behind, with 9 percent harvested as of this week.

Annie Ropeik / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Purdue University cut the ribbon Monday on a $15 million plant research center that's the first of its kind in North America.

Researchers at the new Indiana Corn and Soybean Innovation Center will study the growing habits of cash crops at the school's 1,400-acre research farm.

Ben Loehrke / https://www.flickr.com/photos/benloehrke/

Things are looking up for the quality of this year's corn and soybeans in Indiana and around the Midwest.

That's according to the latest numbers from the USDA, which could be good news for farmers in a year with a bumper harvest in the forecast.

That would mean more supply for the same demand, which might cause lower prices at the grocery store -- but could also mean less money for farmers.

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