DowDuPont

Peter Wright (Photo courtesy of LinkedIn)
Lauren Chapman

President Donald Trump’s nominee to lead the Superfund program says he’ll recuse himself from sites contaminated by his former employer DowDuPont — eleven of which are in Indiana.

The $130-billion merger of chemical and material manufacturing giants Dow and DuPont is now official, nearly two years after it was first announced.

In the next 18 months, the newly created DowDuPont will split into three businesses – for material sciences, specialty products and agricultural chemicals.

The agriculture division stands to affect Indiana the most. Dow AgroSciences has 1,500 workers in Indianapolis, and more at seed and chemical dealerships statewide.

The $130 billion merger between Dow and DuPont received conditional federal approval Thursday.

The companies still have to address areas where the Department of Justice says they’ll have too big a market share, but those aren’t the areas that have Indiana farmers worried.

In approving the merger, the DOJ says Dow and DuPont have to relinquish control of a few assets – a chemical plant in Texas for Dow, and two of DuPont’s insecticide and herbicide brands.

As Big Ag Mergers Pile Up, Farmers Brace For Impacts

Sep 14, 2016
Annie Ropeik / Indiana Public Broadcasting

The list of big agribusinesses pursuing mergers is growing, and their plans could affect Indiana facilities.

Germany's Bayer is buying St. Louis-based Monsanto, and two Canadian fertilizer-makers, Potash and Agrium, announced Monday that they'll seek to join forces, too.

Potash just opened a $90 million fertilizer distribution warehouse and rail hub in Lake County, but its future is now unclear.

Dow AgroSciences / Glassdoor

Fifteen-hundred workers in Indianapolis could know by the end of the month if they're likely to become part of the biggest agribusiness in the world.

 

The Dow AgroSciences employees are awaiting regulatory approval for their parent company's plan to merge with DuPont, then split into three parts, including one for agriculture.

 

If the $130 billion deal goes through, the ag division's corporate HQ and corporate workers would move to Wilmington, Del.