drugs

City of Frankfort

Though the effect on the Greater Lafayette area has gotten more press, the closure of I-65 north has touched Frankfort as well.

This week on Ask the Mayor, we find out from Chris McBarnes what it’s meant to businesses and to commuters that his interstate exit is getting less traffic and that the prescribed detour leads people in the other direction when they turn onto State Road 28.

We also chat about drugs in Frankfort. What can a recent bust of four alleged drug dealers tell us about how much of a problem the city faces?

City of Lafayette

The closure of Interstate 65 northbound has proven a hassle for many a driver over the last week. But it’s hurting businesses along the route, too – including at several Lafayette exits.

This week on Ask The Mayor, we find out what Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski is hearing from business owners and whether he thinks INDOT is working fast enough to solve the problem.

We also talk crime on today’s program. There have been a number of shootings in Lafayette lately, often between people who knew one another.

Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)

A new ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court may complicate Indiana’s plans to eliminate bath salts. Indiana allows the Board of Pharmacy to ban new compounds for the drug on short notice to keep up with changing formulas, but the Supreme Court decision may strike that law.

The Court unanimously voted not to convict a Virginia man for dealing bath salts after ruling prosecutors must prove he knew the chemical compound he dealt and knew it was illegal to distribute them.

City of Frankfort

The City of Frankfort has recently made some changes to streamline the way its municipal court handles cases. The goal is to handle more of them and generate more revenue.

But on the heels of an investigation into the Ferguson, Missouri legal system showing widespread problems from doing similar things, might there be unintended consequences?

Flickr Creative Commons / https://www.flickr.com/photos/intropin/4499124890

Last year, the General Assembly approved a bill allowing emergency medical technicians and first responders to use naloxone, a drug used to halt the effects of an overdose from drugs such as heroin. 

Sen. Jim Merritt (R-Indianapolis) says naloxone saves lives, and its success last year led to this year’s bill, which allows anyone to get a prescription for the drug.

“Go to the pharmacy, get the prescription, have it on their person, and possibly save the life of an addict in their house or someone on the cul-de-sac, in their community,” Merritt says.

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