Education

Indiana lawmakers want schools to develop more robust suicide prevention policies while teachers get training on the issue.

Rep. Julie Olthoff’s (R-Merrilville) bill requires several new steps to create suicide prevention programs. And Olthoff says the first step is creating a statewide suicide prevention coordinator.

“And then they’ll be able to disseminate information and hopefully prevent them,” Olthoff says.

Wes Jackson / https://www.flickr.com/photos/boilermakerwes/3608649743/

As administrators at Rensselear's Saint Joseph's College debate whether the school will be closed more than just the 2017-2018 school year, Purdue's president has offered to take in students who wish to transfer.

A letter from Purdue President Mitch Daniels to Saint Joseph's President Robert Pastoor Friday promises what Daniels calls "concierge-level service" to any student wishing to transfer, including waiving Purdue's usual $60 application fee.

Lawmakers Preach Caution As Colleges Ask For Funding

Dec 8, 2016

 

Indiana’s public colleges and universities appeared before the State Budget Committee to make their cases for funding requests. But lawmakers weren’t very encouraging.

Some lawmakers preached caution during the schools’ presentations, sounding rather pessimistic about how much money the state will have in its new budget.

Indiana University, represented by CFO John Sejdinaj, preemptively acknowledged those concerns.

Barbara Brosher/Indiana Public Broadcasting

A juvenile correctional facility in southeastern Indiana started an experiment two years ago.

It distributed secure tablet computers to all of the girls.

The goal of the technology was to help improve the girls’ educational experiences and opportunities.

But the tablets are having an impact beyond the classroom.

Tablets Give Teachers, Students More Access To Educational Tools

It remains to be seen how Betsy DeVos, President-elect Donald Trump’s choice for education secretary, will influence schools national.

But the prominent Michigan Republican and proponent of private school vouchers has already had some influence in Indiana.

Inside A Dual-Language Preschool For Migrant Workers' Children

Oct 19, 2016
Peter Balonon-Rosen/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Depending on the season, Indiana farms employ between 2,000 and 20,000 migrant farm workers. When workers migrate, often their families do, too.

Children in this mobile lifestyle can face interrupted schooling, cultural and language barriers, and social isolation — factors that inhibit a child’s ability to do well in school.

Students Question Gov. Candidates In Race's First Debate

Sep 28, 2016
NYC Department of Education / http://schools.nyc.gov/default.htm

This week’s first gubernatorial debate, a town-hall-style event at Indianapolis’ Lawrence North High School featured questions not from a moderator, but from students, teachers and administrators.

Republican candidate Eric Holcomb, Democratic candidate John Gregg and Libertarian candidate Rex Bell faced questions on standardized testing, Indiana’s teacher shortage, youth job availability and higher education. They laid out similar policy positions on almost all issues.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

One of the biggest issues in this year’s race for the Indiana House of Representatives District 26 seat may be how to improve the state’s education system.

In the first debate of the race Thursday, Democratic candidate Vicky Woeste said the state needs to reject what she calls the ALEC-driven education agenda, referring to the conservative group which drafts right-leaning legislation for statehouses across the country.

Woeste says she wants to restore public school funding, noting the West Lafayette School Corporation has asked for referendum funding due to cuts.

Peter Balonon-Rosen, Indiana Public Broadcasting

Public schools in Indiana serve about 2,400 students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Of those students a growing number now use cochlear implants, small medical devices that stimulate nerves in the inner ear and give a sense of hearing.

As technology develops, and cochlear implants become more common, many public schools are still working to catch up.

Elle Moxley / StateImpact Indiana

A panel of school leaders and state education experts met for the first time on Monday to map Indiana’s path to compliance with the Every Student Succeeds Act. The federal government passed ESSA earlier this year, replacing No Child Left Behind.

ESSA requires states submit their plans to meet the new benchmarks. State superintendent Glenda Ritz assembled the 15-person panel to create recommendations for this plan.

It includes state goals for various education factors, including English language instruction, graduation rates, and student achievement on state tests.

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