Education

Education news

Six out of the 10 school funding referenda measures across the state won approval from local voters, with two out of the four school districts asking for additional funding from their communities for the first time passing.

Adult Diploma Reimbursement Signed Into Law

May 7, 2019
The bill will fund adult high school diploma programs based on performance – not just enrollment. (Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Lauren Chapman

Gov. Eric Holcomb signed a bill into law this week that will fund adult high school diploma programs based on performance – not just enrollment. The requirements will affect programs across the state.

This year’s first round of school funding referenda includes 10 school corporations, with a handful of the schools asking voters for more funding for the first time.

The state is willing to send funding to schools even if they enroll some 4-year-olds in kindergarten at the start of the upcoming school year. Officials say it’s a small but important shift from a change lawmakers made during the 2018 session.

The 2019 legislative session has officially come to an end, and lawmakers’ attempts to address a number of education issues are receiving mixed reviews.

On the final day of the legislative session, a bill that would have funded specialized teacher firearm training is likely dead, according to its author.

The sticking point for lawmakers: an amendment that makes the training a requirement for school districts that chose to arm teachers.  

When originally written, the bill provided state funding for the optional 39.5-hour teacher firearm training. A handful of Indiana school districts already have chosen give staff access to firearms and provide training, such as Jay County Schools. 

The Indiana Department of Education says Indiana’s teacher shortage is counterproductive to its priorities.

A national early education research group says On My Way Pre-K no longer meets its definition of a state-funded program. The group says the program’s work and education requirements for parents move Indiana in the wrong direction.

The SkillsUSA competition at the Indiana State Fairgrounds on April 20, 2019. (Justin Hicks/IPB News)
Justin Hicks

Students from dozens of Indiana high schools competed at the state fairgrounds over the weekend. The event tested their leadership, career and technical skills. 

Leising's Campaign For Cursive Writing Continues

Apr 17, 2019

Cursive writing is back on the discussion table at the statehouse, as one lawmaker continues her nearly decade-long campaign to require Hoosier schools teach cursive writing.

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