Farmers

Rebecca Thiele / IPB News

 

Almost half of all Indiana farmland isn’t owned by the farmer who works it — it’s rented out. In the same way people who rent apartments are unlikely to invest in them, studies show farmers who rent land are less likely to do conservation practices. 

These practices improve the soil, the water quality, and make farms more resilient to the effects of climate change. Researchers say in order to get more farmers to adopt these practices, landowners are going to have to become more involved with what goes on on the farm.

Many Indiana farmers want more health care options. On Wednesday, they got closer to that goal. An Indiana Senate committee approved a bill that would allow the state farm bureau to offer a group health plan including sole proprietors.

All IN: A Podcast for Farmers

Nov 25, 2019

“Field Work,” a podcast hosted by two young farmers in the Midwest, is about some of the innovative ways farmers are trying to make their farms both sustainable and profitable in a changing industry.

Brock Turner / WFIU/WTIU News

U.S. Rep. Greg Pence (R-District 6) met with farmers Wednesday during a closed-door meeting in Shelbyville.

Reporters weren’t allowed inside, but the congressman says he heard from a number of farmers on issues ranging from immigration to tariffs and trade.

Pence says he trusts President Donald Trump to take care of farmers and mitigate their potential losses.

"It’s really up to the administration to lead and tell us where they’re going to go next," he says. "It’s our oversight responsibility to kind of monitor that."

(Pixabay)
Lauren Chapman

Numbers from the American Farm Bureau indicate soybean exports to China are down about 97 percent of what they were a year ago, thanks to President Donald Trump’s tariffs on China and that nation’s economic retaliation.

(From left to right) Reynolds Farm Equipment CEO Mitch Frazier talks with panelists AgNext CEO Troy Fiechter, farmer Jim Kline, and Taranis head of marketing Alex Whitley during Forbes AgTech Summit in Indianapolis. (Samantha Horton/IPB News)
Samantha Horton

Indiana farmers say high-tech agriculture has helped them be more profitable, but it also poses challenges. Some farms say it’s become difficult to find skilled employees who can use modern equipment.

Indiana farmers anticipate high yields for corn and soybeans. But coupled with retaliatory tariffs against the U.S. from China, Canada and Mexico, farmers’ income could continue to be depressed.

(Wikimedia Commons)
Lauren Chapman

Thursday night at the stroke of midnight, speculations became reality when the U.S.-imposed tariffs on $34 billion worth of Chinese goods.

Climate change can be a polarizing topic to discuss outside of the scientific community. And Linda Prokopy, a professor of natural resource social science, didn’t mince words at recent talk about public attitudes toward climate change.

Pointing toward a Power Point presentation with the word “belief” in quotation marks, she says, “Climate change is a scientific fact, so you can’t really believe or not believe in a fact.”

Brookston Tries To Keep Scammers Out Following Storms

Jun 27, 2016
Chris Morisse Vizza / WBAA News

White County officials are advising Brookston residents to beware of scammers as cleanup continues from last week’s storm.

County Emergency Management Director Chantel Henson says even while the roads into and out of town were closed last week, both reputable insurance adjusters and dishonest fraudsters posing as officers of FEMA tried to sneak into town.

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