Farmers

Brock Turner / WFIU/WTIU News

U.S. Rep. Greg Pence (R-District 6) met with farmers Wednesday during a closed-door meeting in Shelbyville.

Reporters weren’t allowed inside, but the congressman says he heard from a number of farmers on issues ranging from immigration to tariffs and trade.

Pence says he trusts President Donald Trump to take care of farmers and mitigate their potential losses.

"It’s really up to the administration to lead and tell us where they’re going to go next," he says. "It’s our oversight responsibility to kind of monitor that."

(Pixabay)
Lauren Chapman

Numbers from the American Farm Bureau indicate soybean exports to China are down about 97 percent of what they were a year ago, thanks to President Donald Trump’s tariffs on China and that nation’s economic retaliation.

(From left to right) Reynolds Farm Equipment CEO Mitch Frazier talks with panelists AgNext CEO Troy Fiechter, farmer Jim Kline, and Taranis head of marketing Alex Whitley during Forbes AgTech Summit in Indianapolis. (Samantha Horton/IPB News)
Samantha Horton

Indiana farmers say high-tech agriculture has helped them be more profitable, but it also poses challenges. Some farms say it’s become difficult to find skilled employees who can use modern equipment.

Indiana farmers anticipate high yields for corn and soybeans. But coupled with retaliatory tariffs against the U.S. from China, Canada and Mexico, farmers’ income could continue to be depressed.

(Wikimedia Commons)
Lauren Chapman

Thursday night at the stroke of midnight, speculations became reality when the U.S.-imposed tariffs on $34 billion worth of Chinese goods.

Climate change can be a polarizing topic to discuss outside of the scientific community. And Linda Prokopy, a professor of natural resource social science, didn’t mince words at recent talk about public attitudes toward climate change.

Pointing toward a Power Point presentation with the word “belief” in quotation marks, she says, “Climate change is a scientific fact, so you can’t really believe or not believe in a fact.”

Chris Morisse Vizza / WBAA News

White County officials are advising Brookston residents to beware of scammers as cleanup continues from last week’s storm.

County Emergency Management Director Chantel Henson says even while the roads into and out of town were closed last week, both reputable insurance adjusters and dishonest fraudsters posing as officers of FEMA tried to sneak into town.

United Soybean Board

Farmers will soon have one place to store and share all the data they need to do business --  from crop yields to soil samples.

The Agricultural Data Coalition's new service is modeled after an online banking system.

The group of farm service companies and land grant institutions hopes it will refine workflow across a broad business network, where reliance on data has grown with technology.  

Farmers Say New EPA Water Proposals Unfairly Target Them

Aug 26, 2015
Ron Nichols/NRCS

Most people agree clean rivers and streams are vital to our health. The divide comes when the conversation turns to who should make sure those waterways are kept clean, who should regulate them and whether they should be regulated at all.

Later this month, the Environmental Protection Agency plans to implement a new set of rules that expands its reach -- allowing it to regulate not only major rivers, but also the tributaries that flow into them.

Sylvia Bao / http://indianapublicmedia.org/news/

Indiana farmland values declined in all three categories last year for the first time since 2009 -- but a Purdue economist says the drop was expected.

In Purdue’s latest land value survey, top-quality Hoosier farmland values dropped a little more than 5-percent in the last year. 

Average farmland values decreased by nearly 4-percent, while low-quality values are down just shy of 5-percent. 

But Purdue economist Michael Langemeier says he’s not surprised – revenue from crop sales have been down, which usually leads to a drop in land value. 

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