farming

This spring's wet weather and flooding challenged Indiana farmers trying to plant their crops with enough time for them to fully grow. Many delayed planting, some grew no crops at all. 

Courtesy of Purdue University Center for Commercial Agriculture

A recent measure of agricultural sentiment showed farmers increasingly worried about their economic futures. 

The Ag Economy Barometer saw the largest single-month drop since it was created in 2016. Barometer principal investigator Jim Mintert says farmers are worried about low commodity prices and continuing tariffs. 

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

Purdue researchers are investigating the viability of solar power production on farmland, hoping their work in so-called “aglectric” engineering will balance food and energy production.

Chemical engineering professor Rakesh Agrawal says merging the footprint of the two helps mitigate issues presented by a shortage of available empty land.

“The idea is to have energy at low cost, and plentiful everywhere,” Agrawal says. “So we get out of the fossils, and it will change the way we live.”      

U.S. Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.) told Indiana agriculture groups today he’s asking the U.S. Department of Agriculture for clarity on potential disaster relief for farmers.

Heavy rains and floods delayed planting for many corn and soybean farmers this spring. Federal data show only 84 percent of corn was planted in Indiana as of this week. That’s compared to 100 percent last year.

Purdue University Hires First Extension Hemp Specialist

Jun 18, 2019

Purdue University has hired its first hemp specialist to educate farmers and processors.

In a recent survey, most Indiana farmers say the Trump administration's trade policy is putting their operations in “jeopardy.”

Farmers For Free Trade Motorcade Stops In Indiana

Apr 18, 2019
U.S. Rep. Jim Baird (R-Covington) speaks on a panel encouraging Congress to pass the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement. (Samantha Horton/IPB News)
Samantha Horton

A bipartisan farming group is touring the country to build support for the newly proposed trade agreement between the U.S., Canada and Mexico. The motorcade rolled into west central Indiana Wednesday to talk with farmers, industry leaders and lawmakers.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

President Donald Trump’s proposed 15 percent cut in funding for the U.S. Department of Agriculture could have a big impact on Hoosier farmers. 

The budget reduction would likely result in cuts to the federal crop insurance program. It’s part of a broader plan to reduce government spending. 

Farmers have increased their debt in recent years to compensate for lower commodity prices, leading many lenders to require farmers to carry crop insurance.  

More Indiana farmers are planting rye as a cover crop and selling the seeds. But experts with the Office of Indiana State Chemist (OISC) says that could lead to a poorer rye harvest and more harmful weeds in fields. 

John Clare

John Clare talks to Executive Director Leslie Martin Conwell, and Education/Event Coordinator Lauren Reed of the Farm at Prophetstown, a 1920’s farmstead highlighting sustainable agriculture, homesteading, heirloom gardening, and farm to table cooking. Activities go throughout the year, and Conwell and Reed discuss the most popular events, plus ways to volunteer.

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