FSSA

Indiana Approved For Medicaid Mental Health Waiver

Dec 26, 2019

The Indiana Family and Social Services Administration (FSSA) announced the federal approval of a Medicaid waiver that will pay for inpatient stays for Hoosiers diagnosed with serious mental illness.

Indiana Halts HIP Work Requirements

Oct 31, 2019

The Indiana Family and Social Services Administration, FSSA, has temporarily suspended work requirements for people on the Healthy Indiana Plan, HIP.  The move is in response to a federal lawsuit filed last month.

The state of Indiana has proposed a new program to help transition people from Indiana’s Medicaid expansion program, HIP 2.0, to commercial health insurance. If approved, the HIP Workforce Bridge program will be the first of its kind.

Early Learning Grants Awarded In 16 Counties

Jun 6, 2018
(Elle Moxley/StateImpact Indiana)

The state is giving different early learning providers across Indiana more funding as a part of efforts to improve quality and access to preschool programs.

The Family and Social Services Administration (FSSA) announced the recipients of more than $1.5 million dollars in grant money this week, for expanding the capacity of early learning across the state.

Opioid Treatment Access Expanding In Indiana

Feb 9, 2018

Hoosiers in need of addiction treatment have a couple new resources now. The Family and Social Services Administration or FSSA, announced this week, efforts to increase access to treatment in the state with the help of federal funds.

65,000 Hoosiers Could Be Affected By Food Stamp Changes

Feb 23, 2015
Lance Cheung / USDA

 Approximately 46 million people nationally receive money from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.  

Of the 871,000 Indiana residents who use SNAP, 7-percent – about 65,000 people -- are at risk of losing their SNAP benefits in October if they do not find a job or enter a work training program.

Jeanne Christine / https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeannechristine/4677059470

Indiana’s pre-k pilot program launches in four of the five participating counties in January. But many leaders in those counties say they’re still finalizing the details – crossing the T’s and dotting the I’s of fundraising, getting providers up to speed and children into the classrooms.

The clock is ticking. A little less than a month remains until a new flock of learners makes their way into pre-k classrooms in Allen, Lake, Marion and Vanderburgh counties.

State Now Taking Applications For Its Pre-K Pilot

Nov 12, 2014
Nicole Mays / flickr.com/photos/mnicolem/295019550

Indiana’s Family and Social Services Administration began accepting applications Wednesday from providers interested in participating in the state’s pre-k pilot program, at the same time the department announced a new name for the program.

“On My Way Pre-K” is the moniker state officials chose for Indiana’s first state-funded pre-kindergarten program.

Barnaby Wasson / https://www.flickr.com/photos/barnabywasson/27991131

Emerson Elementary School in Seymour is playing host this summer to a kindergarten program called Jump Start – as well as a group of participating five-year-olds like Zoe who is eager to talk about what she’s doing here.

"It’s like getting ready for kindergarten," Zoe says. "My teacher told me we were going to do a lot of stuff."

For Zoe, and many other four and five-year-olds in Jackson County, programs like Jump Start have always been their first introduction to school…until now.

Barnaby Wasson / https://www.flickr.com/photos/barnabywasson/27991131

A preschool classroom can be overwhelming. Take one at Bloomington Montessori for example.

There’s a few dozen students scattered around the room, each doing a different activity. One child is painting on an easel, two boys are building and knocking down a tower of blocks, and a  girl is pouring water from one cup into another over a sink.

Teacher Eve Cusack attempts to stop all of this activity and corral the children to go outside.

Designing, finding, or affording a high quality preschool program is often just as confusing to navigate as the classroom itself.

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