health insurance

Jim Nix / https://www.flickr.com/photos/jimnix/6168273244

Approximately 1,000 Hoosiers showed up in Indianapolis Sunday to protest congressional efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act. The rally was organized by a coalition of local and state-wide organizations, including Planned Parenthood, the Indiana Democratic Party and the state chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America.

Rallies across the U.S. were spurred in part by Senator Bernie Sanders (who was not in attendance at the Indianapolis event).

Wikimedia Commons / https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Medicine#/media/File:Stress_test.jpg

Even though many Hoosiers will be facing increased prices and fewer options on the Affordable Care Act’s federal health insurance exchange next year, Indiana’s enrollment for 2017 is still up by more than 9 thousand people.

According to figures released Wednesday by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, more than 119 thousand Hoosiers have signed up for insurance on healthcare.gov for coverage beginning January 1, a nearly 9 percent increase.

https://www.healthcare.gov/

Open enrollment on the Affordable Care Act exchange begins Nov. 1. But how much Hoosiers will pay on the ACA marketplace depends on many factors — including whom is asked. 

Last week the Obama administration announced new rates on the federal marketplace will rise an average of 22 percent nationwide. That reported increase, though, is only based on one benchmark Silver plan, which is used to calculate federal subsidies.

Presidencia de la República Mexicana / https://www.flickr.com/photos/presidenciamx/

The Indiana Supreme Court has declined to take up a case that questioned whether an uninsured Fort Wayne man was entitled to information about hospital rates for other, insured patients.

In 2013, uninsured Goshen resident Thomas Frost stayed at Parkview Hospital in Fort Wayne for weeks after being seriously injured in a 2013 motorcycle accident. After Frost was discharged, Parkview said he owed nearly $630 thousand in hospital fees.

Alex E. Proimos / https://www.flickr.com/photos/proimos/

Indiana University Health Plans, which provides insurance to approximately 23,000 Hoosiers, is the latest company to announce it won’t be offering coverage through the Affordable Care Act exchange in 2017.

Earlier this year, United Healthcare announced it was exiting Indiana’s individual marketplace, and last month, Fort Wayne-based Physicians Health Plan of Northern Indiana followed suit.

UW Health / https://www.flickr.com/photos/uwhealth/

Indiana’s Medicaid expansion, HIP 2.0, has wrapped up its first year. The state estimates about 60 percent of all eligible Hoosiers have enrolled in some form of the plan, which aims to instill personal responsibility in low-income residents with a payment model based on commercial insurance standards.

Matthew Hurst / https://www.flickr.com/photos/skewgee/2463077387

Two giant mergers among the nation’s five largest health insurers, including Indianapolis-based Anthem, were put on hold Thursday by the U.S. Justice Department, which cited concerns about the so-called “Big Five” becoming the “Big Three.”

State of Indiana / http://www.in.gov/fssa/hip/

During this year’s legislative session, Indiana lawmakers voted to codify – or put into law - the state’s health insurance program for low income Hoosiers, also known as HIP 2.0.

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Jill Sheridan reports the move helps solidify key parts of the program, but it may also pose restrictions. 

Thomas Hawk / https://www.flickr.com/photos/thomashawk/

Four out of the six insurance companies planning to offer coverage to Hoosiers through the federal healthcare exchange next year are proposing double-digit rate increases for individual premiums, according to proposals filed with the Indiana Department of Insurance.

However, the proposals vary widely. For example, Celtic is proposing a 5 percent drop in prices, and Anthem wants an almost-30 percent increase.

Alex Proimos / https://www.flickr.com/photos/proimos/

A new report from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Urban Institute finds 87 percent of Medicaid-eligible children in Indiana have health insurance.

That might sound like a substantial figure, but 32 states have participation rates for that same group above 90 percent. Indiana ranks 44th for its childrens’ Medicaid coverage.

About 4 out of 10 kids in Indiana receive Medicaid coverage...that’s approximately 650,000 people.

And experts say there some are still slipping through the cracks. Almost 9 percent of Medicaid-eligible children remain uninsured.

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