Healthy Indiana Plan

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Hoosiers did not stop signing up for Indiana's Medicaid expansion even though they had to pay into a health savings account. That’s according to new research from three Indiana University professors.

U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar joins Gov. Eric Holcomb and Indiana Family and Social Services Administration Secretary Jennifer Walthall to announce Indiana's HIP approval in February. (Lauren Chapman/IPB News)
Lauren Chapman

A group of non-profits organizations sent a letter to Governor Eric Holcomb this week, urging him to reconsider a new Healthy Indiana Plan, HIP, rule.  

Washington State House Republicans / https://www.flickr.com/photos/wahousegop/

The House Republicans’ replacement plan for the Affordable Care Act—otherwise known as Obamacare—would gradually phase out enrollment in Medicaid expansion programs such as Indiana’s Healthy Indiana Plan.

The bill—released earlier this week—aims to let the expansions remain for another three years. Starting in 2020, enrollment would “freeze,” and no new enrollees would be able to join, which would mean the program would gradually lose members.

Approximately 250 thousand people currently have coverage through HIP 2.0.

IU Expert Says ACA Ruling Is A Win For Indiana

Jun 25, 2015
UW Health / https://www.flickr.com/photos/uwhealth/

The health insurance market in Indiana will remain unchanged after the Supreme Court’s ruling to uphold federal subsidies under the Affordable Care Act.

The 6-to-3 ruling in the King v. Burwell case leaves in place the federal subsidies provided to taxpayers who buy health insurance through the federal healthcare exchange.

Those challenging the law argued the subsidies were designed to go only to those who buy insurance through state-run exchanges.

Pence Touts HIP 2.0 As A Model For Other States

Feb 20, 2015
State of Indiana / http://www.in.gov/fssa/hip/

Indiana’s governor says the expansion of the Healthy Indiana Plan will extend medical coverage to an additional 350,000 Hoosiers, end traditional Medicaid for low-income people, and provide a model for other states.

That’s the message Mike Pence is taking on a tour of medical facilities across Indiana to rally support for HIP 2.0.

Under the plan, recipients must make monthly payments into health savings accounts based on their income. Other Medicaid plans don’t charge fees to beneficiaries.

Repealing The Affordable Care Act Could Eliminate HIP 2.0

Feb 4, 2015
Healthy Indiana Plan / http://www.in.gov/fssa/hip/

Indiana’s Republican congressional delegation is expected to vote this week in favor of repealing the Affordable Care Act — only a week after applauding federal approval of HIP 2.0.

A repeal of President Obama’s signature health care law could have consequences for Indiana’s recent expansion of the Healthy Indiana Plan.

“Technically speaking, if the Affordable Care Act were to be repealed, then the federal funding for HIP 2.0 would go away with it,” Seth Freedman, associate professor at Indiana University’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs says.

Sean Lamb / https://www.flickr.com/photos/slambo_42/

Senate President Pro Tem David Long is warning of far-reaching consequences if the government rejects Indiana's request to expand the Healthy Indiana Plan.

Long and House Speaker Brian Bosma both accuse the Obama Administration of politicizing the debate over Indiana's proposal to use the state's insurance plan as a vehicle for the Medicaid expansion envisioned by the Affordable Care Act. The expansion would make 600-thousand uninsured Hoosiers eligible for the plan, 10 times HIP's current enrollment.

Mercy Health / https://www.flickr.com/photos/mercyhealth/

Indiana now how more people without health insurance than all of our neighboring states according to a new report.

Kreg Steppe / https://www.flickr.com/photos/spyndle/535493117

Indiana is cutting off enrollment in the Healthy Indiana Plan after the program reached this year’s funding limit.

When the federal government reauthorized HIP, the health insurance program for low-income Hoosiers, last year, it required Indiana to lower the income eligibility ceiling from 200-percent of poverty – about $47,000 a year for a family of four – to 100-percent – roughly $23,000 dollars a year. 

The state pays for the program through the tobacco tax, limiting its size to a monthly average of 45,000 people. 

Brandon Smith / IPBS

Governor Mike Pence is offering little explanation about the pending departure of Family and Social Services Secretary Debra Minott. 

In a statement released Monday, Minott said she would be transitioning out of her role within a month or two and would work with Governor Pence to ensure that transition is orderly. 

In a separate statement, Pence simply thanked Minott for her service, while his office cited a desire to change direction at the agency as the reason for the move.  A day later, Pence was saying the same thing.

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