HIP 2.0

The state of Indiana has proposed a new program to help transition people from Indiana’s Medicaid expansion program, HIP 2.0, to commercial health insurance. If approved, the HIP Workforce Bridge program will be the first of its kind.

(Pixabay)
Lauren Chapman

Indiana lawmakers this legislative session will be urged by some to raise Indiana’s cigarette tax by $2. 

Health leaders at a roundtable discussion agreed Medicaid programs are benefitting the state. The meeting Friday focused on ways the different programs help nearly one in five Hoosiers.

Public Health Study Committee Wraps Up Summer Work

Oct 26, 2017

A legislative study committee on public health issues voted Thursday to recommend the General Assembly take action on diabetes and the state’s nursing shortage as it wrapped up its work ahead of the next legislative session.

In recent years diabetes action plans have failed at the Statehouse. But this year’s study committee showed momentum.

Eskenazi pharmacist Jasmine Gonzolva, a non-legislative member of the committee, says much of the focus is on screening and prevention.

Donnelly Won't Support Latest GOP Health Care Bill

Sep 20, 2017

Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) won’t support the GOP’s latest Affordable Care Act alternative.

Donnelly has repeatedly voted “no” this year on measures Senate Republicans have offered to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

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Elliot Englert / for Side Effects Public Media

The public has weighed in on Indiana’s proposal to add a work requirement to its unique Medicaid program, the Healthy Indiana Plan, or HIP 2.0.  More than 40 people submitted their opinions to the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services as of July 18, showing overwhelming disapproval of the proposal.

Governor Eric Holcomb indicated Tuesday he’ll publicly share information on the impact to the state of federal health care reform legislation. Though he says he’ll only do that when a vote in the U.S. Senate appears imminent.

Holcomb has previously evaded any commitment to releasing internal analysis of the impact federal health care legislation will have on Indiana.

The governor’s reasoning for not releasing those estimates remains the same.

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Jake Harper / Side Effects

Indiana has submitted a proposal to the federal government to to add a work requirement to its Medicaid program, the Healthy Indiana Plan 2.0. But the state skirted an important step in the approval process: seeking public comment from Indiana residents.

Muhraz / Wikimedia Commons

Indiana has announced that it hopes to add a work requirement to its Medicaid program. The changes would increase the program’s overall cost by tens of millions of dollars per year, according to the state’s proposal, and could add new hurdles to maintaining coverage for low-income residents.

Sonny Abesamis / https://www.flickr.com/photos/enerva/

A newly-released report from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office predicts 24 million people will lose insurance coverage if the proposed GOP Obamacare replacement passes.

That could have an effect on more than 500,000 Hoosiers.

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