Indiana Debate Commission

The Indiana Debate Commission received more questions about climate change for Monday night's Senate debate than any other topic. 

GOP Senate Candidates On The Attack In Final Debate

Apr 30, 2018
Indiana's Republican U.S. Senate candidates (from left) Rep. Todd Rokita (R-Brownsburg), Rep. Luke Messer (R-Greensburg), and Mike Braun greet each other after the final debate before the May primary election. (Darron Cummings/Indiana Debate Commission)
Brandon Smith

The final debate between Republican U.S. Senate candidates Mike Braun, U.S. Rep. Luke Messer (R-Greensburg) and U.S. Rep. Todd Rokita (R-Brownsburg) was focused almost entirely on attacks between each candidate.

The moderator at one point implored them to answer his specific question – a request the candidates mostly ignored.

Rep. Todd Rokita (R-Brownsburg) reversed a previous decision, announcing Tuesday he will participate in a Senate GOP primary debate organized by the nonpartisan Indiana Debate Commission. (WFIU/WTIU)
Brandon Smith

Rep. Todd Rokita (R-Brownsburg) reversed a previous decision, announcing Tuesday he will participate in a Senate GOP primary debate organized by the nonpartisan Indiana Debate Commission.

flickr.comphotos10333133N03875582123

Lieutenant Governor Eric Holcomb seemed to break with his boss, Governor Mike Pence, Monday on the issue of Pence’s move to block Syrian refugees from the state.

The comment came during the second gubernatorial candidate debate between Republican Holcomb, Democrat John Gregg and Libertarian Rex Bell.

The primary focus was on jobs and the economy.

But the refugee question was posed after a Monday federal appellate court decision to uphold a lower court ruling blocking Pence’s directive to suspend Indiana’s resettlement program for Syrian refugees.

Indiana Republican Party

Republican U.S. Senate candidates Marlin Stutzman and Todd Young met Monday for their first and only televised debate prior to Indiana’s May 3 primary election. 

The two U-S representatives are similar in many ways.  Both argue for lower taxes and reduced regulation.  And, both tout support from anti-abortion groups and the NRA. 

As they sought to define themselves for Republican voters, most of the sparring was over terms like “establishment candidate” and “career politician.”

Darron Cummings, The Associated Press / Courtesy Indiana Debate Commission

U.S. Senate candidate Richard Mourdock says there was no knockout punch delivered in the debate between he and incumbent Dick Lugar Wednesday.  But Lugar says the debate – the only one between the Republican candidates – is the turning point of the campaign.

The debate featured questions on jobs and the economy, foreign affairs, entitlements and even the definition of conservative.  The two found themselves in almost total agreement much of the time. 

Indiana’s U.S. Senate Republican primary contenders Dick Lugar and Richard Mourdock will meet for their only debate Wednesday.

Six-term incumbent Senator Richard Lugar has not faced a primary challenger since he was first elected in 1976.  State treasurer Richard Mourdock brings the challenge with significant Tea Party backing, and that has resulted in an onslaught of negative ads from both sides.

Lugar campaign spokesman Andy Fisher says the Indiana Debate Commission’s format offers a chance to get away from the negative campaigning. 

U.S. Senator Dick Lugar and Indiana Treasurer Richard Mourdock will face each other just one time before the Primary Election.

The Indiana Debate Commission is working out details of the meeting, such as broadcast time, format, and who will moderate. It’s scheduled for Wednesday, April 11, in the television studios of WFYI in Indianapolis.

Lugar has held the U.S. Senate seat for 35 years. Mourdock has served as Indiana state treasurer since February, 2007.