Indiana Department of Education

State Kicks Off New School Cybersecurity Initiative

May 7, 2018

Cybersecurity in schools is the focus of a new initiative from the Indiana Department of Education, and it includes thousands of dollars in funding for some schools.

The initiative aims to get schools on the same page, and more prepared, in terms of cybersecurity. Schools can apply for matching grants of up to $25,000 to build up their cybersecurity systems, and improve 24-hour system monitoring.

The department’s chief technology officer John Keller says it’s crucial, since more schools are offering more tech to students.

State Awards STEM Grants For Elementary Schools

Apr 24, 2018

The state is giving money to nearly a dozen school corporations to help them offer more science, technology, engineering and math – or STEM – education.

Lawmakers approved $1 million in 2017 for the State Department of Education to offer the grants. The department’s Chief of Workforce and STEM Alliances, Amanda McCammon, says the goal is to help schools begin, or build up existing STEM education in kindergarten through sixth grade.

“Schools are utilizing them for professional development for teachers, and then they’re also utilizing it for purchasing curriculum,” she says.

Single Diploma Measure Moves Through House

Feb 5, 2018

Monday marks the last day for Indiana lawmakers to move legislation out of the House of Representatives, and a handful of education measures received approval.

One of those bills, House Bill 1426, would address a change in federal graduation rate calculations. It would create a single high school diploma structure to meet those federal rules, and is a welcome solution to a problem many state and school officials have shared concern over in recent months.

Senate Committee Moves Dyslexia Bill Forward

Jan 24, 2018

A senate committee wrapped up a two-day discussion Wednesday, on a bill that would provide additional dyslexia screening for students and training for teachers.

Many parents who support SB 217 say dyslexia can cause students to fall years behind in reading. Patricia Truelove from Mooresville is a mom of three, and she says this type of legislation could have helped her daughter.

Department of Education Outlines 2018 Priorities

Nov 28, 2017

State superintendent Jennifer McCormick released her priorities for 2018, and those strategies target three areas: student learning, operational effectiveness and school improvement. In this last category, she says she wants to make it easier for teachers licensed in one content area to teach an additional subject if they have the experience.

IDOE Asks Public To Comment On Federal Waiver Request

Nov 25, 2017

Graduation rates at some Indiana high schools could plummet due to a new federal definition of regular diplomas. It would prohibit schools from including students who earn the general diploma in calculated graduation rates. Instead, federal guidelines would only count students who earn the Core 40 diploma or above.

General diplomas require fewer math, social studies and science credits – and less testing.

A report from the Indiana Department of Education shows the majority of teachers surveyed support mandatory cursive writing in elementary school.

The survey went out to teachers, superintendents, principals and governing board members.

It was prompted by legislation from State Senator Jean Leising (R-Oldenburg). The survey asked if the person supports or opposes the mandatory instruction of cursive writing.

The state awarded a three-year, $43.4 million contract to a nonprofit assessment and research company Monday to design the replacement of the ISTEP exam.

The Indiana Department of Education announced the Washington, D.C.-based company was chosen among proposals from five vendors.

The company will create the new I-LEARN exam for students in grades three through eight and a new version of the third-grade reading test called I-Read.

The new tests will be given during the 2018-2019 school year.

Results from the 2017 ISTEP exam remain nearly unchanged compared to last year after an overhaul of the standardized test caused pass rates to plummet two years ago.

Only about half of Hoosier students in grades three through eight passed both parts of the required math and English assessment. The state Department of Education released results today.

For the Spring 2017 test, 51.5 percent of students passed both parts. That’s a fraction of a percent less from the previous year.

Why Fun Matters: The Fight Against Summer Learning Loss

Aug 2, 2017
Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

Kids are returning to school this month, and according to the National Summer Learning Association, about nine out of ten teachers will spend as much as three weeks on review because of summer learning loss. That’s something school districts and libraries continually try to fight with academic programs.

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