Indiana Department of Labor

The Governor’s Workforce Cabinet is holding a series of listening sessions around Indiana over the next two months. It’s seeking citizen input on how to spend federal workforce dollars over the next four years.

Ed Schipul / https://www.flickr.com/photos/eschipul/

Workplace injuries fell 5 percent in 2015 in Indiana. The year is now tied with 2013 as the year with the lowest on-the-job injury rate since the federal government began recording 25 years ago.

According to the Indiana Department of Labor, 3.8 people per every hundred were injured or contracted work-related illnesses last year.

Alejandro Groenewold (modified) / https://www.flickr.com/photos/rust_art/

One of every five of the 38 compliance officer positions at the Indiana Occupational Safety and Health Administration, or IOSHA, are currently vacant, and its staffing issues could be contributing to the agency’s struggles with meeting its enforcement goals.

A federal audit insinuates staffing problems are behind what it calls the agency’s “consistently poor performance” in many crucial areas.

Indiana is one of 22 states with its own OSHA plan, and thus is subject to an annual audit from federal OSHA, called the Federal Annual Monitoring and Evalution, or FAME, report.

Tom Blackwell / https://www.flickr.com/photos/tjblackwell/5659432136

New federal rules making more white-collar workers eligible for overtime pay could be finalized in the next few weeks -- but the state doesn't know exactly how many workers stand to benefit.

Right now, most workers can't earn overtime if they make more than about $24,000 a year. That threshold is slated to more than double this summer, meaning if an employee makes less than $50,400, they'll be paid for working beyond 40 hours a week.

It sounds like good news for workers -- but state Chamber of Commerce CEO Kevin Brinegar isn't so sure.

Sharan / https://www.flickr.com/photos/mauigal/

Every year, states with their own occupational safety and health agencies are reviewed by the federal OSHA. 

The latest audit of Indiana’s agency, IOSHA (which is charged with ensuring the safety of all places of employment in the state, minus federal workers and certain maritime and agricultural operations), has shown that in 2014, the agency took 14 times longer than the national average to respond to complaints and only completed a little more than half the number necessary to meet its workplace inspection goal.