indiana medicaid

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Hoosiers did not stop signing up for Indiana's Medicaid expansion even though they had to pay into a health savings account. That’s according to new research from three Indiana University professors.

Indiana will add five new opioid treatment programs (OTP) across the state to help combat the ongoing drug abuse epidemic and the initiative will also includes coverage of the treatment drug methadone.

The announcement came Wednesday at the Valle Vista treatment center in Greenwood. Indiana Family and Social Services Administration Secretary Jennifer Walthall says the center is being added to the state’s OTP efforts and will offer methadone.

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Indiana has announced that it hopes to add a work requirement to its Medicaid program. The changes would increase the program’s overall cost by tens of millions of dollars per year, according to the state’s proposal, and could add new hurdles to maintaining coverage for low-income residents.

Katherine Peraza poses with her her 3-month-old son. (Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
(Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
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Indiana’s Medicaid expansion, HIP 2.0, has wrapped up its first year. The state estimates about 60 percent of all eligible Hoosiers have enrolled in some form of the plan, which aims to instill personal responsibility in low-income residents with a payment model based on commercial insurance standards.

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Home health providers appear to have successfully lobbied the state not to lower their Medicaid reimbursement rates.

In May, the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration announced it was planning to lower the amount of money home health care workers would get through the Medicaid program—as much as 8 percent for registered nurses and 6 percent for home health aides.

But after discussions between government officials and industry reps, the state has decided to nix its original plan and keep the 2016 rates intact.