Indiana Right to Life

A Planned Parenthood clinic in northwest Indiana has halted abortions because of a state law that involves doctors’ admitting privileges marking the first time the state has used the law to stop services.

In a letter earlier this month the Indiana State Department of Health told the Merrillville Planned Parenthood to stop performing abortions because a doctor with admitting privileges had ended their relationship with the clinic.

An anti-abortion group is criticizing a decline in Planned Parenthood’s services and clients over the last decade. The attack comes as the number of abortions increased slightly.

The number of patients at Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky is down about 50 percent since 2007. The organization went from 35 clinics to 17 in that time.

Indiana Right to Life president Mike Fichter says that’s proof the organization is failing.

Creative Commons / Pixabay

Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill is appealing the federal ruling against a state law requiring women to wait at least 18 hours between an ultrasound and an abortion.

Women in Indiana no longer have to wait at least 18 hours between an ultrasound and an abortion after a recent court ruling halting part of last year’s controversial abortion law.

Angela Layana / https://www.flickr.com/photos/wookie75/

The number of abortions in Indiana decreased in 2015, the latest data point in a six-year decline.

Last year, nearly 8,000 abortions were performed in Indiana, a 2 percent drop from the year before, according to annual data from the Indiana State Department of Health.

Abortion rates have declined in the state since 2009. That roughly lines up with national data showing fewer people undergoing the procedure since 2010.

But Indiana Right to Life President Mike Fichter said, in Indiana, the state’s political climate has a lot to do with the trend.

Joe Gratz / https://www.flickr.com/photos/joegratz/117048243

A federal judge has set a hearing next month to consider a bid to block Indiana’s new abortion law.

Known as House Enrolled Act 1337, the law bans abortions based on a fetus's gender, race or genetic disability, such as Down syndrome.    

The American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana filed suit on behalf of Planned Parenthood in an effort to prevent that law from taking effect in July.

Governor Mike Pence and anti-abortion advocates have said the law values the unborn and the disabled.

State of Indiana / http://www.in.gov/

Governor Mike Pence Thursday signed into law a bill banning abortions performed solely because of a fetus’ gender, race or potential disability. 

The measure also imposes new guidelines for handling aborted and miscarried fetal remains.

The bill drew criticism from doctors, and even some Republican lawmakers, including a few who’ve sponsored anti-abortion bills in the past. 

Indiana Department of Environmental Management / Facebook

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management Tuesday handed down a fine to an Indianapolis company for disposing of fetal remains as medical waste without a permit. 

And Indiana Right to Life and some conservative lawmakers say the case shines a light on the need for a current bill that would ban that practice.

Indiana law requires a permit to dispose of fetal remains as medical waste.  And the Indianapolis solid waste company did not have that permit and was fined around $11,000. 

What's Causing A 20% Drop In Indiana's Abortion Rate

Jul 2, 2015
Alice Harold / https://www.flickr.com/photos/alicejt/4195310965

Abortion rates are on the decline  across the country.

A recent Associated Press survey revealed abortion rates on average dropped 12-percent nationally. In Indiana the decline was even more dramatic. 

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Gretchen Frazee reports on what’s likely causing the decline and what that means for young women in Indiana.

Noah Coffey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/noahwesley/

Supporters of the new law requiring abortion doctors to have hospital admitting privileges don‘t believe that rulings against similar laws in other states will change anything in Indiana.

The state‘s law requiring doctors who perform abortions to document their admitting privileges at hospitals near the clinics took effect July 1st. But over the last two weeks, similar laws have been put on hold by federal courts in two states.

Pages