Indiana State Teachers Association

Chelsea Wardrop / WTIU

Teachers across the state are breathing a collective sigh of relief today, and many are praising the decision not to cut funding for K-12 schools this year even as Indiana faces major financial shortfalls.

Indiana’s state tests have changed half a dozen times for students in the past decade, and with so much on the line, teachers, schools – and families – are trying to keep up.

Educators have long asked for state lawmakers to cut back on the number of policy changes and requirements placed on schools, but some efforts at the statehouse are receiving mixed feedback. 

The Indiana State Teachers Association is pressing forward on demands for lawmakers to send more funding to schools for better teacher pay despite most legislative leaders saying big budget asks have to wait until 2021.

All IN: Red for Ed

Nov 19, 2019

More than 60 school districts across Indiana cancelled classes today, as thousands of teachers signed up to rally at the Statehouse ahead of the upcoming legislative session.

The Next Level Teacher Compensation Commission met publicly for the first time Monday night. In January, Gov. Eric Holcomb tasked the commission with finding innovative ways to raise teacher salaries. 

The former president of the teachers union representing Indianapolis Public Schools pleaded guilty Monday in federal court for embezzlement of more than $100,000 from the labor group.

Rhondalyn Cornett, 54, now faces up to 20 years in prison, fines and more, according to a release from the U.S. Justice Department. 

Thousands of teachers are starting the process of renewing their teaching licenses before a new law goes into effect that requires educators to learn more about workforce and career-related needs for their students and communities.

On the final day of the legislative session, a bill that would have funded specialized teacher firearm training is likely dead, according to its author.

The sticking point for lawmakers: an amendment that makes the training a requirement for school districts that chose to arm teachers.  

When originally written, the bill provided state funding for the optional 39.5-hour teacher firearm training. A handful of Indiana school districts already have chosen give staff access to firearms and provide training, such as Jay County Schools. 

Indiana’s teacher salaries have been the slowest growing in the country according to a national think tank, and the state’s teachers union says it will take billions of dollars to make up for years of inadequate funding.

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